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Thread: Fusible Poly Batting

  1. #1
    Junior Member katzak's Avatar
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    Jan 2011
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    Casa Grande, Az (Originally NYC)
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    I have always used either Warm & Natural or Bamboo cotton batting to sandwich my quilts. My friend just found "fusible poly batting" and said it really makes smoothing out the layers perfectly and easily.

    I'd like to know if anyone has ever used this before and what they think of it?

    How does it handle?
    Does it make for a "too" flat sandwich?
    Washing ? Does it handle the same as cotton?
    Everyone says cotton is best .. what do you think?

    Or, is this just the easy way out .... I value the opinions of all of you skilled and experienced quilters.

    Kat

  2. #2
    Super Member AlwaysQuilting's Avatar
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    I've used the June Tailor fusible batting. It did work easily I thought. Washing was no problem. But now I just use spray basting on reg. batting.

  3. #3
    Super Member LeslieFrost's Avatar
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    I don't remember the brand, but I got some fusible batting for some tote bags, and I did not like it. I did not like having to use a damp cover cloth and leaving the iron in one place so long -- took forever to get even a modest size piece of fabric fused. I'd rather use spray baste.

  4. #4
    Senior Member vjengels's Avatar
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    Aug 2009
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    I've used June Taylor fusible; just used it again.... I like it pretty well, I've found it works best, and fastest if you use a spray bottle of water, your quilt should be pretty damp, instead of your highest steam setting like the instructions say, and your heat should be a little higher than 'wool'. The biggest problem I had is the surface you iron the project on...... an ironing board isn't large enough; you get wrinkles on the back.... you can reposition the backing and re press, but it helps if you can attach the backing... tape it down , keep it tight somehow.. If you're going to handle the quilt alot during 'quilting'.. and who isn't; I would still use some pins, as the adhesive does let go if you handle it alot. Wow, with all that being said; I do like to use it.

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