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Thread: Grandmothers Flower Garden

  1. #1
    Member jlynnbach's Avatar
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    Hello. I really like the looks of Grandmother's Flower Garden, but i am not really good at hand sewing. Can you machine sew this pattern? If so any suggestions?

  2. #2
    Dena789's Avatar
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    You can sew it by machine but if you use whole hexagons, you will be joining everything with "Y" seams, which can be tricky. I have seen patterns where they use 1/2 hexagons, sew them together in rows with the matching colored halves in the next row. Looks a little different because of the extra seam but it gives exactly the same pattern in the end.

    Here's a link to instructions showing "Y" seam method: http://www.sharonschamber.com/free%2...owergarden.pdf

    And here is a video showing the 1/2 hexie method: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F7c1ewoQV24
    She is making a scrappy one but you could make it more planned it you want to.

  3. #3
    Member jlynnbach's Avatar
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    Thank you so much. I will have to try both methods to see it either work for me. Maybe I will just have to learn to hand sew.

  4. #4
    Super Member Jennifer22206's Avatar
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    to be honest, it goes so quickly by hand (the basting and whip-stitching)

  5. #5
    Dena789's Avatar
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    Hand sewing them is nice too and is quite easy. I use this type of project as my "take along" work. All you need is a little zippered bag (like a pencil case) to keep some supplies in and tuck it into your purse. Then, you can work on them wherever you find yourself waiting - like at the doctor's, on buses, passenger in a car, kid's games etc.
    Good luck!

  6. #6
    Member jlynnbach's Avatar
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    I want to make one for my granddaughter who is 5. Do they hold up well when you hand sew them?

  7. #7
    Dena789's Avatar
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    The method of joining is a very small whipped stitch holding the pieces together. I think they are really quite sturdy, even more than a regular hand-sewn seam. There are quilts made this way that are over 100 years old and still hanging in there.

  8. #8
    Member jlynnbach's Avatar
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    what is the best way to cut out the paper pieces and fabric so that they are all perfect?

  9. #9
    Dena789's Avatar
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    I buy mine pre-cut. They are always exact that way and everything goes together very easily. I did try cutting my own using old file folders and my rottary cutter but it is really hard to get them exact. The pre-cuts are quite inexpensive and many quilt stores carry them. I've also ordered them online without any problems.

    The fabric I do cut with the rotary cutter. I first cut strips the width required then stack two strips and cut out the shapes using the 60 degree line on the ruler. Some people just cut squares and fold the extra to the back of the paper.

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