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Thread: Have you tried the fusible batting?

  1. #11
    Super Member ckcowl's Avatar
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    not much new about fusable batting- some people love it- some not so much- buy a small one & give it a try- i find it very handy for some projects---(small ones) but i don't use it for large (queen + ) quilts. i love it for table runners, placemats, totes...wall hangings...
    hiding away in my stash where i'm warm, safe and happy

  2. #12
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    So it is only fusible on one side? hummm, I will try it for some placemats I intend to make and see from there.

  3. #13
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    If it is Hobbs 80/20 quilt batt, BOTH sides are fusible. I lay my sandwich out on the floor and dry iron the front working from the center out. I flip over the entire sandwich and dry iron the back from the center out. You can peel up the edge and re-iron as needed to make sure the back is wrinkle free. I spend the most time getting the back perfect because that is the side you can't see while machine quilting. I put a few safety pins around the edge so I don't accidentally peel up a corner as I move the quilt around while machine quilting.

  4. #14
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    I used fusible batting on a lap quilt and had difficulty hand quilting with it. Otherwise, it worked fine.

  5. #15
    Senior Member Scraplady's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tartan View Post
    If it is Hobbs 80/20 quilt batt, BOTH sides are fusible. I lay my sandwich out on the floor and dry iron the front working from the center out. I flip over the entire sandwich and dry iron the back from the center out. You can peel up the edge and re-iron as needed to make sure the back is wrinkle free. I spend the most time getting the back perfect because that is the side you can't see while machine quilting. I put a few safety pins around the edge so I don't accidentally peel up a corner as I move the quilt around while machine quilting.
    Used this batting for a long time and LOVED it. Since we pulled up the old carpet I no longer have a good place to do it. I am afraid of the heat damaging my new wood floors. The garage floor is concrete but too dirty. I loved the nice smooth sandwich it made. I also would turn the whole thing over and iron it from the back. Sometimes it would start to loosen here and there while I was quilting a large quilt. I'd just run an iron over the loose spots with and re-adhere it. I tried spray but didn't like it as well. I miss my fusible batting!
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    "Piecin' a quilt's like livin' a life...The Lord sends us the pieces, but we can cut 'em out and put 'em together pretty much to suit ourselves, and there's a heap more in the cuttin' and the sewin' than there is in the caliker...I've had a heap of comfort all my life making quilts, and now in my old age I wouldn't take a fortune for them." (Eliza Calvert Hall, Aunt Jane of Kentucky)

  6. #16
    Super Member LivelyLady's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tashana View Post
    I tried the fusible batting, and it was pretty good. But I still like basting with Elmer's School glue. I always have the glue and the batting so no need for me to go out and buy something else. But, if you do not like the Elmer's method, I believe the fusible batting is the next best thing.
    I, too, love basting with Elmer's School glue. Fusible batting worked ok, but I didn't think it smoothed out as nicely as the glue.
    When you sleep under a quilt, you sleep under a blanket of love.

  7. #17
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    Does the fusible 80/20 Hobbs batting have any 'pouf' to it once it's been ironed down?

  8. #18
    Super Member nygal's Avatar
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    I must have been living in a cave some place...I've never heard of fusible batting!!
    When it seems like the world is falling to pieces remember that the pieces are falling into place...the End Times.

    Heaven and Earth are full of His Glory!

  9. #19
    Senior Member happyquiltmom's Avatar
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    Used it once, don't like it. It wouldn't stay fused. I use the curved safety pins when machine quilting, thread basting when hand quilting.

  10. #20
    QM
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    Super Member QM's Avatar
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    I used it once. It was great for the wall hanging I was making, but I would not care for the feel of it in a bed/lap quilt.

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