Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Results 1 to 6 of 6

Thread: Help with bias binding required.

  1. #1
    Member apiarist's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Scotland
    Posts
    73
    Blog Entries
    2

    Help with bias binding required.

    I am wanting to apply bias bindinh to 4" circles, but without success. The end result is pulled and the circle doesn't lie flat. I have tried making small cuts at the end of the circle, but no luck. Is there a trick to this?

  2. #2
    QM
    QM is offline
    Super Member QM's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Northern California mountains
    Posts
    7,299
    You will need to calculate the exact perimeter, precut and connect the 2 ends of the binding before you add it (pressing the seam open). Be sure everything is starched or sized and pressed. Why are you binding something this size? If you are making something like a pot holder, you might be happier finishing it 'pillowcase' (or 'birthing') style.

  3. #3
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    76
    Quote Originally Posted by QM View Post
    You will need to calculate the exact perimeter, precut and connect the 2 ends of the binding before you add it (pressing the seam open). Be sure everything is starched or sized and pressed. Why are you binding something this size? If you are making something like a pot holder, you might be happier finishing it 'pillowcase' (or 'birthing') style.
    Circles that small are very very difficult to get right as there is a big difference in the inside seam and outside seam distances and therefore how much extra the bias needs to stretch round the corners.if it isn't lying flat it is because you have too little fabric around the very outside edge. I would actually not startch the bias too much you need the flexibility. the trick is to push the bias under the machine a little more as you sew the first line down and clip the curve of the bias tape to allow it to spread. it needs to NOT be stretched out and as full as you can get without it puckering. The tape after the first seam will be all wavy and flouncy and that is right.This means when you turn it to the other side there is enough fabric to stretch around the slightly longer perimiter of the piece. you will then have to ease in the second side. I usually stitch this by hand as it is easier to get the fullnes taken in.

    However I do wholehearteted agree that if they are just 4" circles a birthing technique will be far faster easier and give a better overal finish.

  4. #4
    Member apiarist's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Scotland
    Posts
    73
    Blog Entries
    2
    Sorry to be a nuisance, but what is the birthing technique? The reason the circles are so small is that they are to be embroidered and then appliqued onto a cot quilt.

  5. #5
    Super Member ckcowl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Northern Michigan
    Posts
    9,530
    the (birthing) method is placing an interfacing/backing of some sort- right sides together over the circle- stitch around the circle- cut a small X in the center of the backing material- turn right side out- press- top stitch 1/4 around the perimeter---voila- smooth finished edges
    hiding away in my stash where i'm warm, safe and happy

  6. #6
    Member apiarist's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Scotland
    Posts
    73
    Blog Entries
    2
    What a clever idea. Thank you very much.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.