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Thread: help with circles

  1. #1
    Senior Member LindaMRB's Avatar
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    My daughter requested this pattern and I decided I wanted more circles, smaller (see the one-color image with LOTS more circles) to make an overall look rather than the big circles. Partly because her choice of fabrics were not mine; we had trouble coming to an agreement. As an aside, she is quite the artist and definitely has her own tastes... like me.

    The dark blue is called Love Beads from a book "The Modern Quilt Workshop" published by Quarry.

    The lime green "test" is what I tried and you'll see the puckering at the ends; at actual size (6 inches x 10).
    How do I adjust for that?
    What have I done wrong? (I pinned it at center, ends, quarters but think I need to ease it differently?)
    Am I crazy to tackle this???

    BTW, we found TONS of fabulous fabrics at an Amish quilt store in Sarasota, FL. I would love to go back there!

    Love Beads Quilt pattern
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    my computer-generated new design
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  2. #2
    Super Member BKrenning's Avatar
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    Clipping the seam allowance all around might help.

    I think the easiest way to accomplish what you are trying to do would be to applique the circles onto the background fabric. Sewing circles is hard without a lot of pins or the right technique which only comes with practice. The quick way is to make a circle template, baste your fabric over the template with a gathering stitch, pull the gathers tight, use a bunch of starch to hold it, remove the template, applique to background fabric. You could use freezer paper for the template and sew the circle down then carefully snip open the back to remove the template. Freezer paper will help to stablize it while you stitch it down.

    I've also seen a funky inside out method of making a circle on a square that is pieced, not appliqued. Simply Quilts, maybe?

  3. #3
    Super Member SuzyQ's Avatar
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    Maybe you could cut your circle, lay it on the rectangle piece and simply do a satin stitich or zig zag stitch around the circle? If there was too much bulk you could trim the back of the circle away. Does that make sense?

    Susan

  4. #4
    Super Member Deb watkins's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SuzyQ
    Maybe you could cut your circle, lay it on the rectangle piece and simply do a satin stitich or zig zag stitch around the circle? If there was too much bulk you could trim the back of the circle away. Does that make sense?

    Susan
    I also think that if you have lots of circles to do, this may be an easier way!

  5. #5
    Super Member Lisa_wanna_b_quilter's Avatar
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    Depending on the look you want, fusible web turned applique works well. It gives you a smooth turned under edge. You can then applique it down with invisible thread if you like.

  6. #6
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    Check out a technique by Sharon Schamber calles piecelique

  7. #7

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    I too think it would be better to applique the circles. I use a template circle, place the template on fabric, leave 1/2 inch or so beyond template. Place fabric with template on to tin foil, pull the foil up tightly around the template and iron the edges of the foil circle, let it cool(it will burn your fingers) and then applique to the quilt. You can applique by hand or machine. I do by machine and use a very narrow zig zag. Perfect circles every time. One of the best quilts I ever made was an adaptation of "Bubblicious" by Marj Moore. I have attached photos. Good luck.

    The stamped figure is an ant.
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  8. #8
    Super Member Lisa_wanna_b_quilter's Avatar
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    I had forgot about this until I was looking up pieclique. MadQuilter posted this neat tutorial on circles. It might do what you need.

    http://www.quiltingboard.com/t-90945-1.htm

  9. #9
    Super Member BKrenning's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lisa_wanna_b_quilter
    I had forgot about this until I was looking up pieclique. MadQuilter posted this neat tutorial on circles. It might do what you need.

    http://www.quiltingboard.com/t-90945-1.htm
    I think this is the method I saw on Simply Quilts years ago. I also saw an episode with an amazing woman who could actually sew circles and other curvy blocks just like straight lines but you could tell she had been sewing a long, long time. Practice does make perfect if you live long enough--LOL!

  10. #10
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    Linda,
    I've done a queen-size quilt consisting of almost 200 applique circles. I made a template out of heat-safe template plastic (sorry, don't know the real name) then turned the edges of each circle and machine appliqued each onto their own square.

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