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Thread: help with cone thread holder

  1. #1
    Member pam7858's Avatar
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    help with cone thread holder

    I recently got a cone thread holder as I thought it would mean fewer thread changes and I could buy thread a little cheaper. So now I have it but don't know how to gwt the tension right. This may seem really stupid, but just up over that top thing is too loose for sure. Is that what the holes are in the heavier bottom part for? Do run the thread through one and use the weight on the stand????Any explanation would be of help. Thanks

  2. #2
    Senior Member mermaid's Avatar
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    The thread guide on top guides the thread smoothly from the top of the spool. Just then pull the thread across your machine and thread as you normally would if it were a small spool on the machine spindle. Some don't even use a thread stand--they just put the cone in a mug or jar and let it feed from the top.
    Or am I not understanding your explanation? I shouldn't think you would need any tension on the thread holder.

  3. #3
    Super Member #1piecemaker's Avatar
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    Your tension should be on your machine andd not the thread holder. Do you have a picture of it? Maybe it is different than I envision.
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  4. #4
    Super Member Helen S's Avatar
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    I agree with the previous replies. I use one, too, and just set the cone on the spike on the bottom tray, then pull the thread up into the top hook and thread your machine as usual. Your machine sets the tension on it, and yes, it's somewhat loose, but not excessively. If you want it tighter, you can either put one of the cone "socks" over it, like a serger sewing machine uses, or you could also cut a piece out of the leg of either knee hi's or panty hose and just pull it over the cone with the thread coming out the top. That sort of takes up the slack, but I don't find a need for it.
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  5. #5
    Super Member virtualbernie's Avatar
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    Did you get your holder from Superior Threads? If so, they have video's that show how to use it. I was thinking about buying one. I have one with just the one hole in the top and that's where to put the thread through. The one from Superior Threads has a hole in the top and on the sides to accommodate the way the thread is wound on the spool.
    Bernie

  6. #6
    Super Member Jan in VA's Avatar
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    Some machines also have a special guide/hole/metal loop thru which you can guide the thread from a cone holder. Mine is a Bernina and it's on the handle - pull up the handle and check the right end of it. After that, thread as usual.

    I also remember years ago when we first started using cones, in our mugs, we occasionally taped a med/large safety pin upright to the top right hand corner, on the end of the machine, to serve as a guide; the thread went thru the hole on the safety pin; then thread as usual.

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  7. #7
    Super Member burchquilts's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Helen S View Post
    I agree with the previous replies. I use one, too, and just set the cone on the spike on the bottom tray, then pull the thread up into the top hook and thread your machine as usual. Your machine sets the tension on it, and yes, it's somewhat loose, but not excessively. If you want it tighter, you can either put one of the cone "socks" over it, like a serger sewing machine uses, or you could also cut a piece out of the leg of either knee hi's or panty hose and just pull it over the cone with the thread coming out the top. That sort of takes up the slack, but I don't find a need for it.
    That's how it works around here, too, but I find I prefer to wind my thread off on to a psare bobbin & then use it in my machine. I get thread cheaper & just feel like I get more control with it. Plus the thread holder isn't in the way. I HATE it when it gets knocked over & my thread goes flying mid-project.
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  8. #8
    Super Member Pat625's Avatar
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    My stand for the cone was plastic, and it would bend and I felt it was not giving even tension..I now put the cone on my machine, just like you would a spool, but I put it on upside down, so the hole was smaller on the spool holder, and less bouncing around..When I finished a cone, I put it inside the next one, further closing the hole for less motion..

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by mermaid View Post
    The thread guide on top guides the thread smoothly from the top of the spool. Just then pull the thread across your machine and thread as you normally would if it were a small spool on the machine spindle. Some don't even use a thread stand--they just put the cone in a mug or jar and let it feed from the top.
    Or am I not understanding your explanation? I shouldn't think you would need any tension on the thread holder.
    I have my really large cone just sitting on the table and thread running up and over the top of my machine and thread as normal. The smaller cones I put in a cup and up and thru a decorative candle holder that has a hole in it and then over my machine and thread as normal. I don't mess with my tension. As a matter of fact Leah Day said that sometimes when your thread keeps breaking when FMQ you should just put your thread on the table to stop that. I don't know about any special tensions since I couldn't see spending the money for the cone holders when I could do it for free and spend the money on something else.
    Judy

  10. #10
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    I created my own thread holder. I took an empty glass jar (an old heavy one) and set it behind my machine.
    The threads unwinds off the cone with no problem. I keep one machine set up for bobbin winding.
    I do a lot of piecing and also use about 10 bobbins per quilt on my Bailey, I Keep lots of bobbins wound.

    June in Cincinnati

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