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Thread: help with turned applique technique?

  1. #1
    Super Member sew cornie's Avatar
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    I'm getting started on my IRR2 center block which has an appliqued floral motif. I've done fused applique before, but think the integrity of this design would be compromised by visible stitching.

    After consulting my quilting books for tips on turned applique, I still have a couple of questions and would love some advice:

    1. What type of pencil is best for marking applique placement on the background?

    2. I've seen references to pencil-marking the appliqued piece with the turn under line, using the needle to turn as you sew. I've also seen it said to press the edges of the piece over the freezer paper, leaving that in place while stitching and then removing it just before finishing. Any suggestions for what is best for a newbie?

    Thanks,
    Jen

  2. #2
    Power Poster Lacelady's Avatar
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    I use a Sewline propelling pencil, where the 'leads' are available in different colours, i.e. regular grey colour, white, yellow etc. They are similar to a fairly hard ordinary pencil, and draw with a nice fine line. There is also a propelling type holder for a length of eraser that works very well as long as you haven't pressed too hard with the drawing in the first place, though I recommend you testing it on a scrap first. If you want to needle turn, then you have several alternatives to hold the top fabric in place while you stitch. You could pin it, but they drive me crazy, if you can only do that, then I suggest you try pinning from the back, where your sewing thread is less likely to catch on all the pins. You could tack the top fabric down, which is time consuming, but that's what I did with my avatar blocks. I tacked about a quarter inch away from the sewing line, trimmed my top fabric to just less than a quarter inch where I was planning to sew, snipped the edges on curves, then tucked them under and sewed down a bit at a time. Don't trim them all at once, as they could fray, just do an inch or two ahead of where you are stitching. Then the third alternative to pinning or tacking would be the newest one to me, and that is to use a small amount of Elmer's School Glue to hold them in place. I stress use only the SCHOOL version, as that is washable (and by that, it might need two hours of soaking to remove it all, but just leave it for that time, and it should all be out). If you can get the fine tips, then all well and good, or perhaps use a fine paint brush to apply, then put in place, and heat set with an iron. The glue will hold in place while you needle turn. I hope that helps.

  3. #3
    Super Member amandasgramma's Avatar
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    I use the same pencils as LaceLady. But when it comes to the actual sewing, I'm kinda lazy. I use the freezer paper, iron it on the right side of the fabric, trim to within 1/4". I use little tiny pins made for appliqueing and pin them onto the base fabric. I then use a toothpick and make the fabric turn under...I keep the toothpick in my mouth and the dampness makes it grab the fabric and I turn under about 1/4"-1/2" at a time, according to the cutout. It takes practice, practice, practice to do any appliqueing.

  4. #4
    Super Member sew cornie's Avatar
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    Thank you both so much. This is really helpful information. Looking forward to getting started! :-)

  5. #5
    Senior Member QuiltMania's Avatar
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    I use a regular #2 pencil, either sharpened to a very fine point or I use a mechanical pencil. I usually trace the pencil line and fold over as I go. Freezer paper is not my friend so I tend to avoid it.

  6. #6
    TEXASQUILTS's Avatar
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    Here is my 2 cents. Working on my first applique quilt, I used freezer paper on wrong side, used a small ironing wand and turn over the seem
    with freezer paper still attached. I then basted th seams down, pressed
    again very good. When stiching down to the quilts I stich as much as
    possible before I remove the basting and freeezer paper from the piece,
    It works for me and the pieces look very nice and clean crisp edges.

    Just remember not to appliue down too much before you remove paper.
    Leave a big enouch whole to pull it out. I use hemostat to pull it out.

    Hope this helps.
    Texasquilts

  7. #7
    bearpaw's Avatar
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    This technique was posted on another post. I thought this was such a brilliant idea!

    Explanation on middle of page 8, pictures on bottom of page 8, continued on page 9.

    http://www.quiltingboard.com/posts/list/105/21098.page


  8. #8
    k3n
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    Power Poster k3n's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TEXASQUILTS
    Here is my 2 cents. Working on my first applique quilt, I used freezer paper on wrong side, used a small ironing wand and turn over the seem
    with freezer paper still attached. I then basted th seams down, pressed
    again very good. When stiching down to the quilts I stich as much as
    possible before I remove the basting and freeezer paper from the piece,
    It works for me and the pieces look very nice and clean crisp edges.

    Just remember not to appliue down too much before you remove paper.
    Leave a big enouch whole to pull it out. I use hemostat to pull it out.

    Hope this helps.
    Texasquilts
    I do this exactly! And I use a regular pencil to trace the outiline. For very curved edges or circles, I run a line of stitches half way along the seam allowance and pull up over the paper then gently remove the paper before fastening off. Then I remove the basting stitches once it's appliquéd in place. And I either use small appliqué pins to hold the shape in place or baste on if the piece is very small or has a sharp point. Re folding sharp points, I fold the end first then the two sides, trimmed as narrow as I dare. Hope this helps. :D

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