Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 1 2 3 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 24

Thread: How Did You Learn to Use A Thimble

  1. #11
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    howell, Mi
    Posts
    1,861
    I have never learned. I start out with a thimble and eventually have to take it off. I can't find one to fit. They all fall off. I have fairly small fingers and none fit. I think I'm just spoiled and don't want to wear one. I do try, because the needle seems to find the same spot right next to the nail on the middle finger of my right hand. I can't even see the hole, but I sure can feel it!!! I keep trying but I'm beginning to think it's a loosing battle!!!
    Sue

  2. #12
    Senior Member rush88888's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    leland nc
    Posts
    440
    i use a leather thimble, and i think i just purchased it because it was an inexpensive way to go. i don't think i could use a metal thimble for some reason.
    "perfection is the enemy of done."
    "the secret to having it all is knowing you already do."

  3. #13
    Super Member nygal's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    New York
    Posts
    5,265
    I still haven't learned. I do own a leather one..so if I ever really want to use one that is the one I "dislike" the least.
    When it seems like the world is falling to pieces remember that the pieces are falling into place...the End Times.

    Heaven and Earth are full of His Glory!

  4. #14
    Super Member Peckish's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Pacific NW
    Posts
    4,713
    Blog Entries
    1
    I love the leather thimbles, not everyone's fingers are shaped the same. I think part of the problem for lots of people is finding a proper fit.

    When my mom started quilting a couple of years ago, she was having problems getting used to how her thimble felt. I told her to put it on and leave it on while she was doing non-quilting things. She wore it while driving, walking the dog, vacuuming, chatting on the phone, etc. It seems to have worked for her, she got used to how it feels.

  5. #15
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Chula Vista CA
    Posts
    2,927
    To start with I tried the leather thimble and too quickly the needle started to go thru it. Then I tried the plastic one that you boil and adjust it to the finger, it worked well and I bought a couple. Then I went to the Road to California Quilt show and found this lady that makes silver thimbles. She measured my finger and sold me a thimble that fit my finger. It is wonderful. I have three because I bought one a year, haven't seen her the past couple years so hope they have a booth this year. They are not cheap, but each one I have is special, one with an angel, one with a heart and one with a fairy.

    So why so many? One in a sewing basket, one on my thread stand and the other one in my portable sewing kit. It is very hard to sew without one now and it is like needing 2 pairs of glasses, if you only have one pair that's when they break before you need to return to the optometrist.

  6. #16
    Super Member patchsamkim's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Fox Valley Wisconsin
    Posts
    1,926
    I also have only been able to get used to using a leather thimble. I do quilt without a frame or hoop so maybe that is why?

  7. #17
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Southern Indiana
    Posts
    4,253
    I have been quilting since 1975 and still don't use a thimble. I tried them all, and could never get used to any. Finally just gave up, but I have a nice collection of thimbles! LOL

  8. #18
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    dallas tx.
    Posts
    3,563
    Blog Entries
    3
    I had to learn when I was a little girl. My 2 Aunts who were very good seamstress's made me. I don't know how anyone can sew without one. I have run a needle thru a leather and a plastic one. I now have a good metal one with it indented on the bottom that I like.

  9. #19
    Senior Member Weezy Rider's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    642
    Never learned, never used one. Will find something hard to push with, and a small pair of needle nose pliers to pull with.

  10. #20
    Senior Member alisonquilts's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Winston-Salem NC
    Posts
    654
    Quote Originally Posted by BellaBoo View Post
    After the first time I pushed the needle end in my finger. I certainly didn't want a callous or the pain so I put on a thimble and left it on the whole time I was sewing. I kept trying to use the other finger that didn't have the thimble but when the needle started to hurt I switched to the thimble finger.
    This is exactly what happened to me. I tried a cheap plastic thimble first (needle went through it and into my finger after about a month - OUCH!). I also found that it took a long time to find a thimble that fit, and that the outside lip along the base of the thimble and the ridges on the side rubbed the side of my index finger raw, so now the outside of my thimble has several layers of masking tape wrapped around it! (I did try a leather thimble...but the needle went through it fairly quickly...OUCH!)

    I also find that the needle pricking down onto my "under" finger ends up causing a real hole in that finger (OUCH) so I often have several layers of masking tape over the exact spot on my under finger where the needle hits - allows me still to feel the needle but with less blood loss.

    One must suffer for one's art....but thank goodness for masking tape!

    Alison
    Last edited by alisonquilts; 01-12-2013 at 06:20 PM.

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 1 2 3 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.