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Thread: How do I cut sashing strips - vertical or horizontal

  1. #1
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    I still consider myself a beginner with only 3 finished quilts under my belt, and my current quilt project has sashing around all of the 8 1/2 inch blocks. I wish I could give you a link to the pattern, but it is a regional Shop Hop quilt, and I am modifying the pattern so that it will not have cornerstones.

    The pattern has 25 - 8 1/2 inch blocks laid out 5 blocks by 5 blocks. In between the blocks are 2 1/2" sashing both horizontally and vertically. . . so would I take the 2 yards of fabric I purchased for the sashing, and cut across the WOF first for the 7 horizontal strips, and then use the rest of the fabric to cut the vertical strips that will go between the blocks with the remainder?

    It is all very confusing! Any suggestions or do's or don't's would be greatly appreciated!

    Thanks!

  2. #2
    Super Member katier825's Avatar
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    Whenever I have enough fabric, I cut my strips lengthwise. The fabric is less stretchy and works better for me. If your fabric has a directional pattern, you might want to cut both horizontal and vertical.

  3. #3
    Power Poster amma's Avatar
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    You can cut the sashing vertically or horizontally from your fabric. I normally cut them all horizontally (selvedge to selvedge) it is easier to handle the fabric.

    The tip about directional fabric is a good one too :D:D:D

  4. #4
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    Are you asking because the fabric you're using has a directional print on it? Or because of the grain?

    If it's a plain fabric, I just cut strips from WOF (width of fabric) and then cut them to size as needed in that particular quilt.

    If it's because you've got some directional print, then, yeah, you might - might want to fussy cut the strips. It really depends on the visual effect you're trying/want to create.

    Do you have a picture of the sashing fabric?

  5. #5
    Super Member Glassquilt's Avatar
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    If you cut it lengthwise the fabric will not stretch much.
    If you cut it crosswise the fabric will have some stretch.

    Suppose you've made a lot of blocks from scraps and the edges all behave differently. lengthwise sashing may give the quilt more stability.

    Suppose the same style blocks are just a bit different, crosswise may give you just the fudge factor you need.

  6. #6
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    Thanks everybody for the great answers already! This quilting board is the best place!

    There is no longer a picture of the 2009 shop hop quilt anywhere on line, but here is a link to picture of the fabrics: http://www.yelp.com/events/seattle-w...-shop-hop-2009

    The sashing fabric is the periwinkle tonal, and while there are randomly placed ring patterns on the fabric, it does not appear to be directional.

    The pattern originally called to cut the fabric into 112 rectangles that are 2" by 8 1/2", however, the original pattern called for 49 blocks (7 rows of 7) and cornerstones. I am making my quilt smaller with only 25 blocks, and I am not doing cornerstones; and since I am doing only 25 blocks instead of 49, I am increasing the sashing to be 2" wide, so I will be cutting the strips 2 1/2" wide. I just didn't want a lot of seams in the horizontal sashings.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Glassquilt
    If you cut it lengthwise the fabric will not stretch much.
    If you cut it crosswise the fabric will have some stretch.

    Suppose you've made a lot of blocks from scraps and the edges all behave differently. lengthwise sashing may give the quilt more stability.

    Suppose the same style blocks are just a bit different, crosswise may give you just the fudge factor you need.

    I prefer to cut plain fabric on the lengthwise grain (or whichever way stretches less) most of the time.

    The crosswise grain (or the one that stretches more) is more forgiving - and one can ease in a slightly oversize block more easily.

  8. #8
    Senior Member kathyd's Avatar
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    Since quilt police are just a myth...I cut my sashing and border strips in which ever way will give me the length without seams, if I have enough fabric. If it is a busy enough print than it probably won't be noticed if there is a seam.
    I can never remember which way (other than bias) is stretchy anyway! My excuse to daughters has always been "If it isn't life threatening, I don't have to remember it." It's worked for me for 30 years now (that's the age of the oldest)!
    kathyd

  9. #9
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    One strip wof will not go all the way across your 5 blocks and sashing between each block. Your quilt width will be at least 52 inches if I am understanding your layout correctly. Each strip will need to be pieced together to get the width you need.

  10. #10
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    Oops, double post. sorry!

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