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Thread: How do I make a quilt out of T shirts?

  1. #1
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    How do I make a quilt out of T shirts?

    I have some logo'ed T shirts that I want to make into a quilt and have no idea where to start. Any help out there

  2. #2
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    there's lots of info on net... I made 3 and it is fun.. I used woven,fusible interfacing on back of shirt... cut my "blocks" out and piece together and I quilt on my longarm... good luck.

  3. #3
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    I have not done one but it is recommended that the T-shirts have a fusible interfacing ironed to the back. This makes them more stable and less likely to stretch. There are a number of great t-shirt quilts on QB if you use the search box. Most people sash with regular cotton but some don't.

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    hope to finish my first one today. I put fusible interfacing on the back of the shirt and squared them up all different sizes--then built rows from them using the pieces of left over t-shirt which I also put interfacing on. Resulted in four rows --the row is all the same size block, but the rows are different sizes. Allows for bigger shirt photos. I like the random-ness of the quilt, it isn't block, sashing, block, sashing......all the same. Also very colorful. I did use cotton sashing (black mostly) to help stablize the blocks, the project was fun--I learned a bunch just jumping in and doing it, and would do another--with some modifications..........since the shirts are my DD-in laws, I kept it simple and didn't add orphan blocks or printed fabrics, just HER shirts. Hope she loves it- it is a big twin wrap around size.

  5. #5
    Super Member Pat G's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Katiedid2 View Post
    there's lots of info on net... I made 3 and it is fun.. I used woven,fusible interfacing on back of shirt... cut my "blocks" out and piece together and I quilt on my longarm... good luck.
    I'm glad this topic came up since I recently made a T shirt quilt for a friend after I swore I'd never do one. I just couldn't say no to her since the shirts were all very special to her & her husb. before he died. I did fusible on one block but it was too stiff for me. I used a light wt. fusible. I learned that spray starching ea. block heavily worked for me. I was careful to cut ea. logo to get the best of it then it became tricky to fit it all together. I had to get creative with sashings but it worked & she totally loves her quilt.

  6. #6
    pw6
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    that is how I make them also.. if you need to add to the top just add pieced blocks of the same size I also added embroideried blocks as well

  7. #7
    Senior Member gmcsewer's Avatar
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    I use the interfacing on the back of the designs and it keeps everything stable. I assemble a strip with sashing and then I do QAYG to assemble the strips, more like flip and sew. I FMQ each motif in the strip after I have joined it to the quilt. The last one I made was for DGD and I put her name as the last strip by doing PP letters I found on the Internet. The picture is of her layout of how she wanted the shirts placed. I will post a picture of the finished quilt soon. Name:  2013-03-18 11.35.07_0249.jpg
Views: 993
Size:  1.68 MB

  8. #8
    Super Member debbieoh's Avatar
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    Its alot of work and you MUST use fuseable interfacing. They are worth the work

  9. #9
    Senior Member gmcsewer's Avatar
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    I posted earlier today but want to put the finished quilt on for you. Also, you may press over the painted designs on the shirts by covering them with freezer paper, waxed side toward the painted design. Name:  2013-05-03 17.52.43.jpg
Views: 953
Size:  1.71 MB

  10. #10
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    If the regular interfacing is too stiff for you look for one for knits. I use French Fuse most of the time and it has worked great

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