Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2
Results 11 to 20 of 20

Thread: How do you treat fabric that bleeds?

  1. #11
    Super Member QuiltnLady1's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    2,847
    You can get the it Dye Fixative on Amazon -- it qualifies for Prime shipping if you have that.
    QuiltnLady1

    When life gives you lemons, make lemonade.

  2. #12
    Super Member ghostrider's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    4,172
    Quote Originally Posted by Peepers View Post
    I've always used vinegar and it's worked every time. I even made a red and white quilt with JoAnn's Country Classic solids and I've machine washed it since I've finished it and there is not one single spot of red on the white. I just fill put the fabric in the washing machine, dump in half a gallon on white vinegar, fill the machine with cold water just to cover the fabric and let it sit for at least an hour. I then empty out the water, and wash with laundry soap on hot. I throw in a piece of white fabric just to be sure and I've never had a color transfer to the white. I'll probably get flak for this, but, just saying, it has worked for me for years.
    And did you test all those fabrics first to see if they actually were bleeders to begin with? Why go through that whole process if the fabric is not going to bleed anyway? Vinegar will definitely result in no bleeding if the fabric wasn't going to bleed in the first place.

    It is a chemical impossibility for vinegar (or salt) to prevent todays dyes from bleeding. You have simply been lucky, not used any bleeders, and gone to a lot of extra trouble.


    ETA: And what is this Quilting Article that is spreading VERY outdated information to our novice quilters?
    Last edited by ghostrider; 08-20-2012 at 11:11 AM.
    The Earth without art is just "Eh".

  3. #13
    Banned
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    108
    I stand by my post about vinegar! I soak all dark fabrics in vinegar before I prewash. Why would I prewash the fabric, only to risk it possibly fading before I soak it in vinegar? The "whole process" takes about 5 minutes of my actual time as I don't stand there and watch it soak for an hour. Unless you have tried vinegar and had it fail, you are spreading false information about vinegar and advocating dumping more chemicals into our already polluted water supply. I knew I would get flak about this, but, as I said, vinegar has NEVER failed me and I buy a lot of fabric at JoAnn's, WalMart, and Hobby Lobby. Again, I suugest you not knock vinegar unless you've tried it and had it fail. Geez!

  4. #14
    Senior Member AtHomeSewing's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Pacific NW USA
    Posts
    897
    How do you keep your water temperature at 140?

    Thanks! (:



    Quote Originally Posted by Peckish View Post
    I soak the fabric in 140 F water, with Synthrapol added, overnight. This is what a lot of fabric dyers do.
    Connie
    At Home Sewing

  5. #15
    Power Poster
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    MN
    Posts
    14,853
    I'm still wondering why we even need to have this discussion about commercially dyed fabrics!

    Other than getting the excess dye rinsed out, why should we have to spend more money to finish the manufacturer's job?

  6. #16
    Super Member ghostrider's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    4,172
    Quote Originally Posted by Peepers View Post
    ... you are spreading false information about vinegar and advocating dumping more chemicals into our already polluted water supply.
    Vinegar WILL work on acid dyes, however acid dyes are never used on cotton anymore. Acid dyes are used on protein fibers...wool, silk, alpaca, etc. Vinegar has NO effect on the fiber reactive dyes used on celulose fibers...cotton, linen, etc. Do the research...the information is not false, it is fact. The choice to use it or not is up to each individual.
    http://www.pburch.net/dyeing/FAQ/settingdye.shtml
    http://www.pburch.net/dyeing/FAQ/lightfastness.shtml
    The Earth without art is just "Eh".

  7. #17
    Banned
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    108
    And I just googled over 400,000 sites that says it works, and that's a fact, too. Whatever, again, I'll keep using my vinegar as it's worked for over 50 years for me and y'all do what you want, but, please, stop responding to my posts.

  8. #18
    Super Member Peckish's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Pacific NW
    Posts
    4,629
    Blog Entries
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by AtHomeSewing View Post
    How do you keep your water temperature at 140?

    Thanks! (:
    I heat it on the stove. I know a few quilters who love to dye, they set their water heater temps that high, but I have kids who aren't always paying attention when they get in the shower.

  9. #19
    Power Poster
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    MN
    Posts
    14,853
    If I was doing my "OWN" dying, I think taking all these extra steps would be fine and dandy.

    In my opinion, if a commercially dyed fabric doesn't stop releasing dye after two or three rinses or washes, it's defective and should be returned to the store.

    (Unless there is a disclaimer on the end of the bolt - Madras plaids used to notorious for bleeding - but there was a statement to that effect on the end of the bolt. I don't know if they still are or not - )

  10. #20
    Senior Member pinkberrykay's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    SOO, MI
    Posts
    825
    I use Retayne for all my reds, blacks and blues. Let soak in the sink with super hot water then wash in hot water with color catchers. No bleeding on the color catchers when it comes out of the dryer.

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.