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Thread: How much to charge for donated items?

  1. #1
    Super Member JNCT14's Avatar
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    My daughter made the high school cheerleading squad and just as with any sport, there are a lot of fundraisers and events to raise money. One thing we are doing is having a booth at our local Potato Festival in August. The volunteers are organizing a booth to sell items with the school colors.
    I volunteered to make some quilted items to sell and I found a nice tablerunner pattern on Quiltbug.com. It is a pretty pattern and I saw pictures from some of our members on the board who used this pattern to make runners for church bazaars, etc.
    I figure that these will be about 15" x 40" finished - my question is (because they will probably ask me) - how much to charge? I don't want to overprice them and I am donating all the time and materials, but they should be worth something. Anyone out there with experience in making items to donate and sell and an idea on pricing? I might include some tabletoppers if I have time, maybe some placemats too. (Boy, am I ambitious - trying to finish my black and white 'Think Outside the Box' quilt for the Durham Fair as well, lol!!!!)

  2. #2
    quiltilicious's Avatar
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    I charge high. But I donated to a Tricky Tray (raffle auction), so people were purchasing raffle tickets for a baby quilt.

    Are the contributions tax-deductible for the purchaser? If yes, you can charge a little more for things (think PBS and their fundraising).

    think about what an upscale boutique in your neighborhood would charge for this, and price it similarly. You may also want to put a sign in the booth "made by local fiber artist Your Name" to help justify the non-thrift store price for the items.

  3. #3
    Moderator sharon b's Avatar
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    Can they sell tickets for a chance to win them or maybe a silent auction ? I have no clue about pricing, but if it is a fair type atmosphere people might not think to spend what they are worth.

  4. #4
    Super Member Scissor Queen's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by quiltilicious
    I charge high. But I donated to a Tricky Tray (raffle auction), so people were purchasing raffle tickets for a baby quilt.

    Are the contributions tax-deductible for the purchaser? If yes, you can charge a little more for things (think PBS and their fundraising).

    think about what an upscale boutique in your neighborhood would charge for this, and price it similarly. You may also want to put a sign in the booth "made by local fiber artist Your Name" to help justify the non-thrift store price for the items.
    It would not be a tax deductible contribution. When you receive something of value in return it's not a contribution.

    I price table runners in between $30 & $40 dollars unless they're smaller than usual or made with batiks.

  5. #5
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    You probably need to take into consideration the market area -

    I think it is fair to ask for - at the very least - the cost of replacement materials - even though you did donate the item -

    Example: You would have to spend $15.00 for materials to make another one - charge at least that - then more as you think customers might be willing to pay.

    A lot of people have absolutely no idea how much fabric and sewing stuff costs.

    If you wanted to - you could put up a sign that says: "Of course you could make it, but when? and for how much?" and then put up a materials list. :twisted:

    Good luck with the bazaar.

  6. #6
    Super Member janRN's Avatar
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    I agree with Bear. Know what your market will bear. At a school fundraiser people aren't going to pay high, boutique range prices. You have to keep the prices low-make simple products like pot holders, placemats, small table squares. You're probably not going to sell anything for over $15.00 no matter how beautiful and hand made your work is.
    Know your demographic-my area is really depressed and people wouldn't even buy a $5.00 pot holder--they can't. It's different raising money at a school craft fair than at a community craft fair. Just my humble opinion from what I've experienced in my neighborhood.

  7. #7
    shopella's Avatar
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    I always liked the boothes who give the patern out.most printed the patern 2 to a page to save on paper, but it offers another way to make money sell patern for 1$ and put the price you need on table runner. Someone may buy it but manny will buy the patern! also a half page full of web sights for free paterns would sell easily.They say it is the information highway so just sell some maps!

  8. #8
    Super Member JNCT14's Avatar
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    This venue is not a craft fair - its a town-based local argricultural fair. They have the usual fair rides and games, plus a tractor pull, a dog catching Frisbee contest, a car show, a local band, fireworks and all the potato and corn themed food you can eat. Oh yes - the great cow chip raffle as well.....some crafts but not a lot.
    I was thinking between $15-20 for a table runner?

  9. #9
    shopella's Avatar
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    find out how much the team needs to rais and split it up between the amount of items offered.My sisters basket ball coach did that and it worked out perfict. of course 15-20 sounds good too!

  10. #10
    Pam
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    Super Member Pam's Avatar
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    You live in a rural area like I do. Those ladies know quilting even if they do not do it themselves. I would charge $20 or $25, it will sell. If it sells in 10 minutes for $5 you will know it is underpriced, then what? (Most fairs frown on mugging to get your table runner back).

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