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Thread: How to price a quilt?

  1. #1
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    Okay--there has to be a formula somewhere. I've heard to triple the cost of materials...but is that picking an average price on yardage? And thread is really included?

    Or to remember how long a project took and mulitple by an amount. The way I quilt is stealing a moment here and there. It would really take the fun out of it to keep track of my time. I did it once--when a parent of a student asked me to make her daughter a quilt...and I said I'd keep track and I believe I asked for $15/hour. She paid for the flannel! It took a long time...it's always much longer than I think to make anything. She ended up paying me evern more than I asked, but I have to say, I do not like doing requests.

    What about tops vs the complete package?

    I don't want to make $4/hour for my quilts--I'd rather keep them for my kids' families, but I want to be fair too.

    What is the magic formula?

  2. #2
    Super Member Marcia's Avatar
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    Karla, First of all, I like your new avatar. Second-I have never sold a quilt, and have no idea how to price one. I did a google search and found these two sites that might help you some. Good luck!! Your work is beautiful-do not sell yourself short by asking too little.

    http://www.artisticthreadworks.com/public/971.cfm

    http://www.bryerpatch.com/faq/marketing.htm

  3. #3
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    Marcia--those are wonderful links! I'm going to read them more closely tomorrow.... I'm beat.

    So far--it looks like nothing is under $1000. :lol: :lol:

    Thank you.

  4. #4
    Moderator tlrnhi's Avatar
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    I have no clue what to ask.
    I actually asked someone else who sells their things what a fair price would be. It's hard to put a price on our "wares".
    Courtney got a gift from MIL sent to her. It's a gorgeous quilt, I"m not too thrilled by the person who quilted it, as you can see the "pencil/chalk/whatever" marks on the top that didn't come off.
    Anyway..it's a twin size, very pretty. I know my MIL did the embroidery on the squares and then sent it to be finished. The price that was on the Customs Form was $500. It's pretty and all, but I don't see $500 in the quilt itself. Maybe because I know the prices of what it costs? I dunno....

  5. #5
    Super Member Marcia's Avatar
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    Terri-I think we have a hard time putting a proper value on what we do. To most of us it is a hobby that we do because we enjoy it. That is tough to put a price on. When I sent my chicken quilt to be longarm quilted, she put an insurance value of $500 on my quilt when she shipped it back-I was shocked!! But that is her business and she knows quilts, so who am I to argue with her :lol:

  6. #6
    Moderator tlrnhi's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marcia
    Terri-I think we have a hard time putting a proper value on what we do. To most of us it is a hobby that we do because we enjoy it. That is tough to put a price on. When I sent my chicken quilt to be longarm quilted, she put an insurance value of $500 on my quilt when she shipped it back-I was shocked!! But that is her business and she knows quilts, so who am I to argue with her :lol:
    Exactly!
    Maybe we need someone who's been in the longarm business to help us with pricing. They should know what the prices are comparable to, right?
    But, like Karla is asking.....
    If someone can come up with a formula, that would be great!

  7. #7

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    There really is no formula for this, because some quilts take very little time and some take a lot of time. The only real way to price them is to keep track of your time and charge an hourly rate, plus the cost of materials and shipping.

    A queen sized double wedding ring quilt should sell for much more than a queen sized Log Cabin quilt. If a quilt is machine quilted, it has taken weeks instead of months - it should be priced accordingly.

    Lately, I have been pricing quilts with estimates for labor - telling my clients that they will need to pay for the materials up front and half of the labor cost - the other half of the labor cost and the shipping charge is due when I email to tell them their quilt is finished. This also helps them decide what they want to spend on fabric. They can decide if they want Walmart or the local quilt store - or I help them shop online for better fabrics at Walmart prices. They like the flexibility and they gain an understanding of what fabric really costs!!

  8. #8
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    Wow--those are good prices!! :shock:

    I guess I'll price quilts like I price horses--the more I need it to move, the less it is. The more I want to keep it--up goes the price. :wink: I've never needed any of the items, breathing or not, to leave. I'd rather give quilts as gifts than sell for too little.

    Cathe--that makes a lot of sense. :-)

    Thanks Loretta.

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