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Thread: How to rip fabric?

  1. #1
    Super Member nannyrick.com's Avatar
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    Smile How to rip fabric?

    I was wondering how to rip fabric and end up with a straight piece. I have tried before and it was a
    disaster. I would appreciate your replys.
    Thanks,
    Elaine
    so many quilts to make, so little time.

  2. #2
    Super Member Favorite Fabrics's Avatar
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    What kind of a disaster did you get?

    The edges will always be ripply if you rip rather than cut.

  3. #3
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    explain disaster

  4. #4
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    I notice that my first rip is always differnt- sometimes up to 6 inches difference from one side of a wide backing to the other side. But once it is straight I feel better.

  5. #5
    Super Member Deborahlees's Avatar
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    the only reason I would rip is to either get a good straight edge to start cutting, or if I was making something that required ripped fabric such as a toothbrush rug or a woven fabric bowl. When I worked in a fabric store, we always ripped only silk and I believe satin (been a long time)

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by KarenR View Post
    I notice that my first rip is always differnt- sometimes up to 6 inches difference from one side of a wide backing to the other side. But once it is straight I feel better.
    Are you saying the tear went off grain - or that the cut end was cut on the bias?

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Deborahlees View Post
    the only reason I would rip is to either get a good straight edge to start cutting, or if I was making something that required ripped fabric such as a toothbrush rug or a woven fabric bowl. When I worked in a fabric store, we always ripped only silk and I believe satin (been a long time)
    The only piece of silk I bought (at $24.00 a yard) - the clerk pulled a thread, and then cut the piece.

  8. #8
    Super Member patchsamkim's Avatar
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    Fabric will tear better if you tear parallel with the selvage. Crosswise tearing doesn't usually tear as well. If you are going to tear crosswise, it works best if you make a clip at the fold of the fabric, and tear towards the selvages, instead of one long tear from one selvage to the other.

  9. #9
    Super Member PaperPrincess's Avatar
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    I have also found that if I really go for it, ripping it quickly in one go, it produces less ripples than if I go slowly and do a few inches at a time. Seems counter intuitive, but it works for me.
    "I do not understand how anyone can live without one small place of enchantment to turn to."
    Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings

  10. #10
    Super Member DebraK's Avatar
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    yes, that is how I tear crosswise.
    I have chosen to be happy because it is good for my health - Voltaire

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