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Thread: I got sucked in . . . :( UPDATED -

  1. #11
    Super Member vicki reno's Avatar
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    Here in Raleigh, that's all I have to go by, but that's about what it'll cost. :(

  2. #12
    Super Member ceannastahr's Avatar
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    heres a hint if your bobbin casing is plastic and has nicks in it take an emory board to smooth the out the nicks. I have done this many times with no problems

  3. #13
    Super Member Joan's Avatar
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    Being totally unmechanical, I can identify with your frustration. But, an overall "tune up" probably isn't a bad thing for a sewing maching you love and use alot. (My hope is that it will work better you--not ball up on the back or whatever)

    Keeping my fingers crossed.....

  4. #14
    Senior Member hannahsmom's Avatar
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    that is the going rate.... it is hard to buy these machines that cost an arm and a leg then fork out that kins of money for tune up and stuff, but that is what we have to do. Hope he gets it working like new for you and soon. It is hard to be without a machine. What kind is yours?

  5. #15
    Senior Member
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    thanks ladies, for the support. i guess it isn't such a bad deal after all. i have kept the lint out of it, but i was told to not oil it myself. he did say that i need to change the needles more often (err on the side of 'too often' he said). i looked at some gutterman thread today at jo-anns and that's probably what i'll use on my next free motion quilting project.

    hannahsmom - it's a Janome 8080 (from Sears in 2004). it's been a great machine for the money!

  6. #16
    Senior Member
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    i learned something about machine service that made me sick!

    I had been taking my New Home computerized machine for cleaning and was most often told it was full of lint. The price went from $50 to $75 and at a point I said to hubby "this machine is old enough that I think we shoud take it out of the case and clean it ourselves." Out came the tools and we took the bottom off. WHAT???? have I been paying for? Everything was sealed. There was absoutely no part of the workings of that machine visible. The only place lint could go was in the race. And a vacuum will suck it out. I have not taken my machine back for service since. I also was suckered in and won't let this happen again.

    Many older machines have exposed parts underneath, but since this is a sealed machine, there was no reason other than to rip off his dumb customers who thought there was lint in the bottom. I was mortified...and quite a bit smarter.

    For assistance in "sucking" the lint out of the race, I suggest the use of a spare turkey baster. I have one that fits into the end of the hose on my vacuum, and I does a great job on the machine and also my serger. Sure is cheaper than what I have been paying. No More!

    Have a great day and use those bucks for fabrics!

    June

  7. #17
    Super Member Quilting Aggi's Avatar
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    It is amazing how much you can save by learning the different ways to clean your own machine. I have a Husqvarna Platnium 750. I've had my baby for 3 1/2 years now and I have YET to get it serviced!!! I take alot of my machine apart (which is not alot actually) and clean it myself.

    Last week I went to a maintenance course for my machine and I learned sooooooo much more that I wasn't doing and know I have saved myself alot more money. Yes I even learned how to clean up those pesky nicks that the throat plate gets when the needle hits it (well the tiny ones.. when there are bigger ones, then yes it must need to be replaced.)

    I teach my students how to clean out their machines after every course. You should clean out your machines after every project or every 12 hours of use. Change needles regularly,

    timing issue.. well that is something that the technician would have to play with.. that one I don't know, but I do know how to detect the signs of a possible timing issue.

    Wow that is big money some of your are having to pay out for servicing your machines. ouch.

  8. #18
    Super Member Quilting Aggi's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by june6995
    i learned something about machine service that made me sick!

    I had been taking my New Home computerized machine for cleaning and was most often told it was full of lint. The price went from $50 to $75 and at a point I said to hubby "this machine is old enough that I think we shoud take it out of the case and clean it ourselves." Out came the tools and we took the bottom off. WHAT???? have I been paying for? Everything was sealed. There was absoutely no part of the workings of that machine visible. The only place lint could go was in the race. And a vacuum will suck it out. I have not taken my machine back for service since. I also was suckered in and won't let this happen again.

    Many older machines have exposed parts underneath, but since this is a sealed machine, there was no reason other than to rip off his dumb customers who thought there was lint in the bottom. I was mortified...and quite a bit smarter.

    For assistance in "sucking" the lint out of the race, I suggest the use of a spare turkey baster. I have one that fits into the end of the hose on my vacuum, and I does a great job on the machine and also my serger. Sure is cheaper than what I have been paying. No More!

    Have a great day and use those bucks for fabrics!

    June
    Another option is get a can of compressed air.. perfect to use in those teenie tiny spots your vacuum hose can't get into!

  9. #19
    Super Member Quilting Aggi's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Skeat
    It's a good deal for $80! Here just to look at your Janome and not even touch it is $65...then it goes up from there. This is literally your driving force to keep your art going...so, keep it going:)). If you know a machinist...they can smooth your plate of it's nicks prob for free. They prob put it on a buffer to smooth it out. I (knock'n on my wooden head)that I haven't done that to mine...but I do take it apart and clean and oil it myself. I love those good acrylic paint brushes for craft painting...the lint just clings to them!! And they get to those little corners you can't reach...I gently roll it, and the lint just rolls out holding on to the brush. And, if you sew alot...there's a bunny living inside of it!:0)Skeat
    a nice fluffy cosmetic brush is great too!

  10. #20
    Senior Member
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    Aggi, I read somewhere not to use compressed air on a computer key board because it forces dust and dirt into crevices where it should not go. I have applied that same rule to the sewing machine. What do you think about this idea? Is it possible it could be driving the dust and fuzz someplace where it could cause damage? I am not sure about it myself, but decided to take the precaution. I have never had a repair on my machine that is close to 25 years old. We all follow our own rules and that is OK..Whatever works!

    June

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