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Thread: I know Stitch in the Ditch is hard. Is you LA'er able to stay in the ditch very well

  1. #1
    Senior Member
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    I know Stitch in the Ditch is hard. Is you LA'er able to stay in the ditch very well

    So, another question to help me understand what to expect when using LA services. Is it really hard for LA's to stay in the ditch when doing SID?? I am asking because my LA did some SID and didn't stay in the ditch for more than a few inches at a time and the "out of the ditch" stitches are more than a hair or two out of the ditch. Really, not much care was used. I suppose this is expected to keep costs down?? I did some SID on my own machine last winter and I know it is really hard and just takes a lot of slow, slow sewing. Using a LA, I imagine it is a bit different. Just wondering.

  2. #2
    Super Member Treasureit's Avatar
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    I don't think SID is really that hard to do myself...one of the few options I do have for my quilts. I use a walking foot and I have no problems. Long armers are using free motion to do it...harder I would think thank a footed machine. Give it a try...you might enjoy it and it is MUCH cheaper! Some people just use a decorative stitch over the ditch and then it isn't an issue to stay in that ditch.

  3. #3
    Super Member Gramie bj's Avatar
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    I have a LA, only quilt for myself but do not SID on it. My Lizzie moves very smoothly and if I move at a smooth speed I can't seem to keep my lines exactly on the line, if I move slower it seems to give an even worse jerky line ( it could be the operator's fault LOL) so for SID I use my Janome with the walking foot. I have been know to LA a quilt then take it to my Janome for any SID I want to do. (I pin the SID area before I advance the top on my LA) This all takes extra time but it works for me.

  4. #4
    Member Tttdoc's Avatar
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    SID on a longarm is not hard but does require practice and good ruler skills.
    Tracy

  5. #5
    Super Member ckcowl's Avatar
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    with a long arm- sid is quite difficult- how straight of a line can you draw with a pair of handle bars 12"+ above what you are drawing on?
    that's why many long arm quilters charge alot more if asked to do sid. your quilt will probably look fine-
    once it is washed/dried...very few people unless at a show/being judged- look at the quilting with a magnifying glass.
    if you were in my area i would invite you in to try some sid with the long arm to see just what it is like. I tell people when they bring me their quilt- i am not real good at free motion straight lines...patterns are easier. i always have samples to show people so they can decide if they really want sid & are willing to pay the extra for it.
    hiding away in my stash where i'm warm, safe and happy
    Colleen's custom quilting; longarm services and custom quilt commissions.

  6. #6
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    I am not a long armer but I would think that they could do it if they do ruler work BUT if you lay a ruler on your seams, you will see that they are not perfectly straight. Can you lay a ruler along her SITD and see if she did it freehand or by ruler?

  7. #7
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    With my LA I have to find my perfect speed, have my SID ruler and just go along slowly and I can keep it in the ditch pretty well...it does take practice practice practice though...I love the look of SID so I tend to do that and my meandering a lot.
    LIVE ~ LAUGH ~ LOVE

  8. #8
    Power Poster dunster's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tttdoc View Post
    SID on a longarm is not hard but does require practice and good ruler skills.
    Absolutely, it can be done with a ruler, but it's more time consuming than free hand work, and so it costs more. And if the ditches aren't straight, it takes even more time to stay in them. Add to that the fact that the top needs to be well pressed with the seam allowances going in a consistent direction.

  9. #9
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    I have tried SID with my shortarm which I had before, and I prefer FMQ over SID. I could never stay within the lines when I was coloring pictures as a kid anyway! Kinda challenging holding the ruler and the handle at the same time! Sometimes seams are not perfectly straight, either. I will not attempt SID with my new machine.

  10. #10
    Member Tttdoc's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dunster View Post
    Absolutely, it can be done with a ruler, but it's more time consuming than free hand work, and so it costs more. And if the ditches aren't straight, it takes even more time to stay in them. Add to that the fact that the top needs to be well pressed with the seam allowances going in a consistent direction.
    In response to "dunster" replying to "tttdoc": I didn't say they it didn't take more time, only that it can be done (and done well) if you are practiced and good with rulers. If a longarmer is going to offer SID then they should charge appropriately for their time but the customer should also expect to receive quality SID in return their money. If a quilt is not a good candidate for SID (ditches are not straight or seams were not alternated to allow for a flat quilt top) then the longarmer may be best served by not agreeing to do it. I routinely SID with my Gammill Vision 22-10 but all my work is custom so I spend a good deal of time keeping my practice up (no pantos and no Statler Stitcher).
    Tracy

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