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Thread: I need help resizing patterns

  1. #1
    Senior Member
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    Does anyone know if there is a site where I can go to resize patterns? I have some that are 9'' and I need 12 and 1/2'', and some are 16 "and I need to down size to 12 and 1/2" if anyone can help guide me in the right direction I would appericate it.

  2. #2
    Power Poster erstan947's Avatar
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    I'm not so good at math. I just make trial blocks until I get the size I want. Not much help....but it works for me:)

  3. #3
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    Depending on the pattern shapes, the best and most accurate way to upsize or down size is to redraw the pattern on graft paper and add seam allowances. Copiers are not always reliable in doing this as angles can turn out to be inaccurate especially if you do this with seam allowances.
    The copier will make the seam allowances wider or narrower than needed. You have to do it without seam allowances and then add the 1/4" but still need to carefully measure to make sure the finished size is correct.

  4. #4
    Senior Member yellowsnow55's Avatar
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    That's what I was going to say! :thumbup:

  5. #5
    Member QuiltNGanny's Avatar
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    That's what I've done when needing a different size.

  6. #6
    Super Member bebe's Avatar
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    quilters cache has patterns in different sizes
    you can google a pattern and ask for directions for 12 in block

  7. #7
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    I throw the original on a copier and enlarge it until it's the size I want. Then make practice blocks until it's right.

  8. #8
    Super Member moonwork42029's Avatar
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    I have books of 6" patterns and would love to make them bigger too.

  9. #9
    Senior Member qbquilts's Avatar
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    Most 9" blocks (really, 9 1/2" before being sewn together) are some type of 9-patch block made up of 3" units. Simply change the finished size of these units to 4" to get a 12" block (12 1/2" before being sewn together with other blocks)

    Most 16" blocks (really, 16 1/2" before being sewn with other blocks) are some type of 16-patch block made up ofr 4" units. Simply change the finished size of these units to 3" to get a 12" block (12 1/2" before being sewn together with other blocks)

    Try looking at various quilt blocks, regardless of size, and see if you can spot if they're a 9-patch or a 16-patch. Doing so will help you be able to draft patterns in the future. You can use the blocks at Quilters' Cache for practice.

  10. #10
    Senior Member qbquilts's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by moonwork42029
    I have books of 6" patterns and would love to make them bigger too.
    To resize most blocks, look to see if it's a 4-patch, 9-patch, 16-patch, 25-patch, or 49-patch. Sometimes the patches are pieced themselves (like a HST making up one patch) and sometimes a single piece of fabric covers multiple patches (like in a Bear's Paw).

    Most blocks like to use friendly sizes for the patches, so that gives you a hint about what type of ?-patch it may be. For example, 25 patch blocks tend to finish at a multiple of 5 (5", 10", 15", etc.). 49-patches tend to finish at a multiple of 7 (so 7", 14", 21"). 9-patches tend to finish in multiples of 3 (3", 6", 9", 12", 15", 18", 21", etc.) 16-patches tend to finish in multiples of 4 (4", 8", 12", 16", 20", 24", etc.) 4-patches tend to finish in multiples of 2 (2", 4", 6", 8", 10", 12", 14", 16", etc.)

    If you can ID what type of patch it is and know the "patch size" for that type for the new block size, it is very easy to adjust.

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