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Thread: Iron on batting

  1. #1
    Super Member Minda's Avatar
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    Has anyone used iron on batting? I'm wondering how well it works and what the pros and cons are. Hope someone can help me. Thanks.

  2. #2
    Quilt n stitch's Avatar
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    Hi Minda, I have used fusible batting and liked it because then the pieced top and the backing can be ironed together and they don't slip as I machine quilted. I am very new to quilting so don't have much experience but have made a couple of wall quilts and have also quilted some stitchery. I kind of wonder how it will wash but once quilted maybe that isn't an issue. Anyway, that's my take on it.

  3. #3
    community benefactor Knot Sew's Avatar
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    I have used fabric glue a dot here and there helps, and you can pull it apart if you have to.......

  4. #4
    Norah's Avatar
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    I really like the spray adhesive to hold the batting in place. It can be repositioned without much effort, and holds until I get through quilting even a big quilt. The needle resists going through the fabric only so slightly as to be barely noticable.

  5. #5

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    I Like the iron on batting better then the spray adhesive, it also can be repositioned if needed. I have made T-shirt quilts and the iron on can be trouble, if the t-shirts have a rubberie design ...melts.

  6. #6
    Moderator kathy's Avatar
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    I haven't tried iron on batting but I have used the spray but still basted. I wonder how it would work if you didn't baste? I'm sure it would be fine for hand quilting but I'm wondering about machine quilting. Does anyone else quilt on a regular machine on a regular table? I just wonder if it is supposed to be such a hassel or if I'm doing something wrong.

  7. #7
    Boo
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    Senior Member Boo's Avatar
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    I totally agree that machine quilting with a shortarm machine on the dining room table is a hassle. One of the main reasons that things go wrong, is the weight of the quilt vs the height of the machine. Gravity fights you every step of the way.
    My first suggestion would be to check second hand stores for a sewing machine table that has a well in which to place your machine. This will put the bed of the machine even with the work surface.
    Secondly, when working with a large quilt consider changing the way you face the machine. I roll large quilts and quilt facing the head of the machine. In order to do this comfortably, I place the sewing machine table against the dining room table and put a card table on other side with machine sandwiched between. Then I put my chair at the head of the machine. Starting in the middle of the quilt, I can then slide the quilt back and forth with no pull from it's weight.
    I hope this is helpful. Let me know if I can be of any more assistance.

  8. #8
    BarbC's Avatar
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    I use basting spray only and love it! I machine quilt on my regular sewing machine on my dining room table. I have done 7 quilts that way this year with no trouble at all.

  9. #9

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    I think the biggest problem with a dinning room table is the height; the easiest way to machine quilt is by having your elbow at the same level as the table. I went to Salvation Army and bought a strong desk with a draw in the center. My husband cut a rectangle from the top and made a hole in it with the sewing machine’s shape; this acts like an insert that can be pulled out to change the bobbin or to clean and oil; the sewing machine sits on the bottom of the draw and is flush with the top of the desk. The total cost was $150.00 with the rental of a pick up truck included! And the best part … all the draws that I have on both sides of the desk. It works very well and beats the price of a machine cabinet – and you do not need to wait for your lottery winnings! I hope it makes sense to you since I am not sure I explain it well.
    If you use furniture polish on the top of your table your quilt will slide on it and reduce the strain on your arms; just make sure you clean the top very well before you place the quilt on it.
    Hope I was of some help.
    Lucia

  10. #10
    Boo
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    Lucia, what a wonderful use of a heavy desk. I used to have one and never even considered doing that. Wish I had that old desk now. :lol:

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