Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Results 1 to 7 of 7

Thread: Iron-On Transfers verse Printing on fabric directly?!

  1. #1
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    North Dakota
    Posts
    257

    Iron-On Transfers verse Printing on fabric directly?!

    I bought some iron-on transfer sheets for ink jet printers size 4x6....I am making a block with a picture on in the center of it... you would print off your picture onto the transfer, then iron-on the transfer sheet to the material.

    I did try printing directly onto the fabric and then washed it to see if it would fade and indeed it did, it faded enough to know that after like 4 years or less I bet you could hardly read it..the method I used was put my fabric onto freezer paper then ran it through my printer then ironed it to set the ink...then the next day I ironed it again and put it into the wash with a tiny bit of arm and hammer washing detergant...

    Does anyone have any experience of which method holds up best after washings and shows least amount of wear after time? The only thing that scares me about iron-on transfers is cracking and it flaking off...has anyone had that happen?
    LIVE ~ LAUGH ~ LOVE

  2. #2
    Power Poster nativetexan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    1,ooo miles from home
    Posts
    13,336
    Blog Entries
    2
    sometimes things need to sit a day or more before being washed. Did you use Bubble jet set or pre-treated fabric you bought? oh was it an ink jet printer? that too makes a big difference.

  3. #3
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    North Dakota
    Posts
    257
    Quote Originally Posted by nativetexan View Post
    sometimes things need to sit a day or more before being washed. Did you use Bubble jet set or pre-treated fabric you bought? oh was it an ink jet printer? that too makes a big difference.
    Yes I have an ink jet printer. The fabric was just right off the bolt, I would have to order bubble jet set as no place in my area sells it ...I had watched some youtube videos and they never used anything like pre treat or bubble jet set on theirs...I just put a iron-on onto some fabric and am going to see how it looks after I wash it.
    LIVE ~ LAUGH ~ LOVE

  4. #4
    Power Poster nativetexan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    1,ooo miles from home
    Posts
    13,336
    Blog Entries
    2
    you want to use fabric you've washed to remove fabric softener from. that helps. good luck.

  5. #5
    Super Member Scissor Queen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Southwest Kansas
    Posts
    4,812
    Quote Originally Posted by QuiltingByCourtney View Post
    I bought some iron-on transfer sheets for ink jet printers size 4x6....I am making a block with a picture on in the center of it... you would print off your picture onto the transfer, then iron-on the transfer sheet to the material.

    I did try printing directly onto the fabric and then washed it to see if it would fade and indeed it did, it faded enough to know that after like 4 years or less I bet you could hardly read it..the method I used was put my fabric onto freezer paper then ran it through my printer then ironed it to set the ink...then the next day I ironed it again and put it into the wash with a tiny bit of arm and hammer washing detergant...

    Does anyone have any experience of which method holds up best after washings and shows least amount of wear after time? The only thing that scares me about iron-on transfers is cracking and it flaking off...has anyone had that happen?
    Ink jet printer ink does not heat set. You have to treat your fabric with bubble jet set first.

  6. #6
    Super Member ckcowl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Northern Michigan
    Posts
    9,530
    fabric has to be pre-washed- with detergent, no fabric softener before printing- to remove the sizing/chemicals so the inks can saturate the fibers- either bubble jet set or soda ash will work- and purchase good quality permenent ink cartridges- don't use the lesser expensive-off brand, refillable cartridges- those inks are meant to wash out.
    let the ink *cure* - i generally give it at least 24 hours- then heat set-
    if using the transfers- with time they do (fade or crack) just like a t-shirt with iron on transfers---to avoid that it is best to not launder it often- fold the transfers in before putting into wash (t-shirts they tell you to turn inside out before washing) and always use cold water - a low heat dry---they will last a long time if they are treated (gently and correctly- so will printed fabric)
    hiding away in my stash where i'm warm, safe and happy

  7. #7
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    North Dakota
    Posts
    257
    Quote Originally Posted by ckcowl View Post
    fabric has to be pre-washed- with detergent, no fabric softener before printing- to remove the sizing/chemicals so the inks can saturate the fibers- either bubble jet set or soda ash will work- and purchase good quality permenent ink cartridges- don't use the lesser expensive-off brand, refillable cartridges- those inks are meant to wash out.
    let the ink *cure* - i generally give it at least 24 hours- then heat set-
    if using the transfers- with time they do (fade or crack) just like a t-shirt with iron on transfers---to avoid that it is best to not launder it often- fold the transfers in before putting into wash (t-shirts they tell you to turn inside out before washing) and always use cold water - a low heat dry---they will last a long time if they are treated (gently and correctly- so will printed fabric)
    Hi ckcowl, what is soda ash? where do you buy it?
    LIVE ~ LAUGH ~ LOVE

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.