Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Results 1 to 5 of 5

Thread: Lining wool lap blankets

  1. #1
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Charlotte, NC
    Posts
    128
    I have been given some beautiful Pendleton wool as a result of judging wool sewing contests. I am thinking of using some of it to make lap blankets or throws to sell in our retirement facility's craft sale.

    I have 3 questions about this;
    How large should I make a lap quilt or throw?
    What should I use for lining the blanket?
    How should I finish the edges? (fringe, binding, or simply sew right sides together with lining?

    Thanks for any help.

  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    514
    Pendleton wool is beautiful and if it is lightweight, I would use flannel on the back. 36 x 36 or 45 x 45 is a nice size for a lap quilt. Take a piece of fabric that size and lay it over your knees, does it cover well or would you like it bigger? For someone in a wheelchair I would sew right sides together, for someone who is ambulatory like yourself, a fringe of wool yarn or a binding would be very nice. Lucky the person who gets this and I hope they don't put it in the washing machine. Be sure to mark it 100% wool. Dry clean only.

    Carol J.

  3. #3
    Super Member auntpiggylpn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Michigan. . .FINALLY!!!!
    Posts
    6,796
    Blog Entries
    1
    I know as a nurse who worked many a day in nursing homes, there is no guarantees that something that is dry clean only will not be washed in a conventional washer and dryer. We always requested families when bringing in blankets for the residents that they be made of fabrics that would wash well as these are often washed on a daily basis.

  4. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    514
    Quote Originally Posted by auntpiggylpn
    I know as a nurse who worked many a day in nursing homes, there is no guarantees that something that is dry clean only will not be washed in a conventional washer and dryer. We always requested families when bringing in blankets for the residents that they be made of fabrics that would wash well as these are often washed on a daily basis.
    You are so right, wool is not a good product to use in nursing homes. Maybe she can make the Pendleton fabric into something for herself. I would hate to see it after it was washed and dried any other way.
    I wash hand made quilts for friends who are in the nursing home here so they don't have to go to the laundry there.

    Carol J.

  5. #5
    Super Member
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Merced, CA
    Posts
    4,230
    Blog Entries
    1
    I still have (and can almost wear again and will, 15 or so pounds from now) a very expensive Pendleton wool skirt that we bought on a trip to Oregon. It's still in perfect shape (I'm not so much) and was and is in fashion and probably always will be.

    Check out some of the Pendleton fashions online. You might find something that you want to make with this lovely fabric.
    ----------------------------------------------------------
    Pendleton High Fashion Think Out Loud
    Aug 11, 2011 ... Pendleton had fashion blogs buzzing when the company announced its Portland Collection earlier this year. The collection, which comes out ...
    www.opb.org/thinkoutloud/shows/pendleton-high-fashion/ -

    Similarto Pendleton High Fashion Think Out Loud
    Pendleton getting attention for eco-fashion | Sustainable ...
    Jul 19, 2011 ... One of the original sustainable fibers, wool is gaining

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.