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Thread: Long arm quilt frame using standard sewing machine

  1. #1
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    Question Long arm quilt frame using standard sewing machine

    I am investigating buying a Grace long arm frame for my sewing machine. My sewing machine does not have a stitch regulator nor does it have a digital speed control. Grace has made a frame for Baby Lock. It is a majestic frame. Does anyone have experience with quilting on a frame with a standard machine? If you have a Grace Majestic Frame, do you like it?

    Thank you in advance.

  2. #2
    Super Member jgriinke's Avatar
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    I don't have either, but do have a frame and a home stretched machine. You may want to check out the Yahoo group - homequiltingsystems. It has a wealth of information about doing what you are talking about. You can use about any machine on a frame, just know that when you get to the end of the quilt - you will only have about 2" of depth to quilt on. My home stretched machine doesn't have any bells and whistles, but gets the job done.

  3. #3
    Super Member Candace's Avatar
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    The small opening on home machines severely limits your ability to quilt large quilts and certain FMQ designs. Many times you have to remove the quilt from the frame, turn it and start again. You really need to consider the throat space of the machine you want to use.

  4. #4
    Junior Member An Arm Long's Avatar
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    I have a Majestic 10 foot frame with a Baby Lock Crown Jewel which is an 18inch longarm. The frame is great - very sturdy. It does not shake at all and I love the rails system. I am sure I could use it with a domestic machine, but would need a carriage to put it on. Candace is right about the small opening. When you get to the bottom of the quilt and most of the quilt is rolled up on the take up rail, it may be 5 or 6 inches in width on the rail. With my Bernina, that would only leave me 1 1/2 to 2 12 inches of quilting room.
    Good luck with your endeaver.
    When I bought my system, Baby Lock was offering no interest loans.
    Beth in Maryland

  5. #5
    Super Member alleyoop1's Avatar
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    I have a Bernina quilt frame (made by the Grace Company) and I have done 3 double bed size quilts on it with my Bernina 440 standard size sewing machine. You are limited to the amount of quilting area but if you are careful and innovative you can do a really nice job within the small area. I have not tried pantographs yet, but plan to on my next quilt. I have a total quilting area of approx. 4" to 5". Make sure you roll up the quilted parts really tight so your quilting space is as large as possible. Also, if you have a full size frame, you can load your quilt sideways so you have less quilt to roll on the take up bar.

  6. #6
    Super Member soccertxi's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Candace View Post
    The small opening on home machines severely limits your ability to quilt large quilts and certain FMQ designs. Many times you have to remove the quilt from the frame, turn it and start again. You really need to consider the throat space of the machine you want to use.
    I started out with a B-line table top frame and a Juki (9 inch throat-bigger that most home machines) The frame was sturdy and the juki did a great job. I did get frustrated with how many times I had to roll the quilt. However, I learned ALOT with that set up. Mostly that I COULD machine quilt on a frame. It prepared me for a larger machine and eventually a gently used Gammill. I would have loved to go straight to the Gammill, but if I had not been suited to machine quilting on a frame, I would have felt badly that I spent that much money! I eventually sold the Juki when I upgraded to an HQ16, and sold the whole system to a friend when I upgraded to the Gammill. SHe was THRILLED and will be content with that set up as is. You need to do what your heart and your budget will allow. Good luck and happy quilting!
    Beth in AZ
    www.bzyqltr.blogspot.com
    Innova 22' with Lightning Stitch and Pantovision
    Keep away from people who belittle your ambitions. Small people always do that, but the really great make you feel that you too can become great. Mark Twain

  7. #7
    Super Member Rose Marie's Avatar
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    My frame is an Imperial and it took the professional installer 6 hrs to put it togather.
    It works very well and the carraige glides like it is on air.
    My strait stitch Baby Lock Jane has a stitch regulator that I paid $500 for but love it.
    I have to save up for a long arm as the 9 in throat is a real hassel to use.
    Learning to use a long arm setup is enough without having to contend with a small machine.

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