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Thread: long arm quilting question

  1. #1
    Senior Member Maksi's Avatar
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    Last year i've made a very large quilttop. It's 2,40 by 2.40 centimeter. Because it's so big I have trouble to handquilt it myself and I even didn't get started because of the size.

    I was thinking about sending it to a longarm quilter. So I went to the internet and find 4 longarmquilters in the Netherlands with pricelists on their site.

    I saw the prices and thought OMG!!, I have to save for that first. :shock: Offcourse I want to pay a fair price for the work. But maybe I can send my quilt better to US, England or Germany?

    What are random prices for longarmquilting in your area?


    (here you see the dutch prices Last year i've made a very large quilttop. It's 2,40 by 2.40 centimeter. Because it's so big I have trouble to handquilt it myself and I even didn't get started because of the size.

    I was thinking about sending it to a longarm quilter. So I went to the internet and find 4 longarmquilters in the Netherlands with pricelists on their site.

    I saw the prices and thought OMG!!, I have to save for that first. :shock: Offcourse I want to pay a fair price for the work. But maybe I can send my quilt better to US, England or Germany?

    What are random prices for longarmquilting in your area?

    Here you see some Dutch prices http://www.thefinishedquilt.com/EN/index.html

  2. #2
    Super Member athenagwis's Avatar
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    I sincerely apologize for my lack of conversion skills, but I am not sure how to convert your quilt size into inches and I don't know how to convert prices to American, but I do know that quilting prices in the US tend to be .01 to .04 per square inch. I would say you could expect to pay anywhere from $150 (very low end, very simple meander) to $350 (fancier design) for a King size quilt. There are a lot of people in the US that do long arming, so you would have a good choice of places to go. The cost of shipping the quilt may be cost prohibitive though.

    Good luck!
    Rachel

  3. #3
    Super Member quiltlonger's Avatar
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    Here's a what if... What if they were to just Baste the quilt top,batt and backing together for you,then you could hand quilt it should be much cheaper and you would get the satisfaction of quilting it without the pins and frame and worry of puckers/wrinkles in the back. I own a long arm machine and have down this for a number of "hand quilters" Good Luck

  4. #4
    Senior Member Maksi's Avatar
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    I did get a lots of offers and they were al great and prices were good. I picked one to do my quilt but I keep the others in mind for other tops. I love to handquilt but that takes me 6 months a king size top and Im a disaster wit machinequilting so Im very happy with al these great offers.

    This is my top. Designed it myself and happy the way it turned out.
    [img]http://www.mijnalbum.nl/Foto-HXC4QWUB.jpg[/img]

  5. #5
    Senior Member Maksi's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by quiltlonger
    Here's a what if... What if they were to just Baste the quilt top,batt and backing together for you,then you could hand quilt it should be much cheaper and you would get the satisfaction of quilting it without the pins and frame and worry of puckers/wrinkles in the back. I own a long arm machine and have down this for a number of "hand quilters" Good Luck
    This is also a good idea to remember. Maybe I will do so.
    Thank you quiltlonger. :)

  6. #6
    Power Poster sueisallaboutquilts's Avatar
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    Maksi, your quilt is beautiful!!!!!!! :D

  7. #7
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    Have any of you that do long arm quilting (I have a Tin Lizzie) every used clear polyester thread? I have heard you need to reset all your tensions.

    Also, what about using minkee for the back? What are the things I need to do or not do so that it doesn't get pulled too tight.

  8. #8
    Super Member Yarn or Fabric's Avatar
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    What I would do if I were in your position is to cut your batting in to strips - manageable quilting sized strips and start on the left side of your quilt, quilt the top, the batting and the backing. Don't quilt all the way up to the edge of the batting. When you are done with that section, fold back the backing and the top then push the next piece of batting along side of it and either whipstitch it by hand or do a very wide zigzag with your machine to join the batting pieces then quilt the next section. You won't have so much bulk to deal with because the batting won't be adding to it. Can you tell that I am not a hand quilter? No way, no how. I don't like doing it.

    You can roll up the areas that are not being quilted and clip them with big hair clips or clothes hangers or something like that. The batting is the bulkiest part of it all.

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