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Thread: Which longarm??

  1. #1

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    Any recomendations as to which longarm to purchase for a beginner? Don't want to start out on the cheapest type then realize later I should have spent more $ on a nicer one. Yet- don't want to go crazy and spend $$$$$$$. Thanks for any suggestions

  2. #2
    Super Member ckcowl's Avatar
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    buying a long-arm is like buying a car- it is a large investment (anywhere from $7000 on up)
    you should NEVER put out that kind of $$ without test driving and deciding what is best for you.
    the long arm i have i happen to love- i'm used to it- it does what i need it to do- it fits me-
    i have a friend who had the same machine- she got hers a couple years before i bought mine- in the 5 years she had the machine she only successfully quilted 2 or 3 quilts- always had problems- and simply hated the machine- finally she gave up and sold it-
    don't let this happen to you-
    if you want to buy a long arm you need to do research- and travel= go to shows and shops where they have them and try out as many as you can before making a decision as to which machine is the machine for you.

  3. #3
    Super Member amandasgramma's Avatar
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    I had a Pfaff midarm and a Pfaff longarm - both purchased on 2nd hand market. Because I didn't have a dealer close to home and had problems, I was beyond frustrated. Bought a HandiQuilter Avante and haven't looked back. It's a great machine.....$8-9000. without the computer portion and the easiest. Make sure the shop where you buy it has a repairman that's knowledgable about longarms and will let you test drive the machine.

  4. #4
    Super Member PegD's Avatar
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    Alot depends too on how much and what kind of quilting you are going to do on it. Only for personal, or for sale? Also can you get a basic machine and then add to it later? So many decisions. I have a HQ Sixteen with stitch regulator, but it is only for my use, so no fancy extras. Good luck with your search and try not to get too overwhelmed.

  5. #5
    Super Member Lori S's Avatar
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    I would suggest for an investment of this level .. go to a major quilt show ... all of the comapnies will have machines their for you to test drive . You may not live near a major show , but if you need to travel to get to one it is money well spent .. to get to see them all in one place .. makes comparision much easier and efficient.

  6. #6
    Super Member knlsmith's Avatar
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    Its like picking out a husband. Everyone wants/likes something a little different. I have the Tin Lizzie 18 LS and really like it. My dream is a 26inch gammill.

    I will say one thing, get a METAL frame, not a wood. I have a wood one, but tried a few metal ones in Paducah. Wow! What a difference.

  7. #7
    Super Member PaperPrincess's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lori S
    I would suggest for an investment of this level .. go to a major quilt show ... all of the comapnies will have machines their for you to test drive . You may not live near a major show , but if you need to travel to get to one it is money well spent .. to get to see them all in one place .. makes comparision much easier and efficient.
    What Lori said.
    I agree that it would be worth your time and money to travel to a show where you can see multiple vendors machines. You need to drive before you buy. Plus, you'll get to look at all the show quilts!!!
    I would do some reseach first and make a list of your needs vs. like to haves:
    Throat depth, frame length, stitch regulator, panto system (laser, stylus, none), computerized quilting, computer design program?
    Also make sure you have enough room for the frame you are considering. You will need to be able to walk all the way around.

  8. #8
    Super Member btiny36's Avatar
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    I have a Tin Lizzy and just love love her....For the price it was the most econimical LA to purchase on the market...but like most have said...it's like buying a car...so weigh you pro's and con's and do lots of research and try and test drive....

  9. #9
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    You might also consider a company that has a payment plan with no interest if paid off in 4 years. That could be a really big help.

  10. #10
    Power Poster nativetexan's Avatar
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    find some qlt stores that have one for you to use. rent time on it. try different brands.

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