Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Page 1 of 4 1 2 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 36

Thread: This May Be A Stupid Question, But...

  1. #1
    Senior Member DonnaFreak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Kentucky
    Posts
    322

    This May Be A Stupid Question, But...

    OK...so if a free-motion sewing machine foot doesn't even touch the fabric, why use a foot at all? Exactly what does the foot do? Do you really HAVE to pay the high bucks to get a darning/quilting foot? Would it harm the machine to just lower the feed dogs and remove the foot? What am I missing here?

    Donna

  2. #2
    Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Ovilla, TX
    Posts
    1
    Right off the top of my head the primary reason might be for safety. If I'm free motion quilting, it would be easy to stab my finger if I didn't have that tiny bit of metal or plastic to remind me where my limits were.

    My longarm has a big hopping foot and one time a few months ago, the edge of my pinky finger got caught under the needle - ouuuuch!

  3. #3
    Super Member charmpacksplus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Lafayette, Louisiana
    Posts
    1,649
    I think it holds the fabric down close to the plate even though it doesn't press it down like a regular presser foot. Without it the fabric would pop up higher and you'd have a mess. And you might run over your fingers.
    But you could try it and let us know what happens :-)

  4. #4
    Super Member Eddie's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Arkansas
    Posts
    3,066
    Quote Originally Posted by charmpacksplus View Post
    I think it holds the fabric down close to the plate even though it doesn't press it down like a regular presser foot. Without it the fabric would pop up higher and you'd have a mess. And you might run over your fingers.
    But you could try it and let us know what happens :-)
    Yep, that's been my experience as well, it keep the sandwich from flopping up and down so much.
    "If you want a golden rule that will fit everything, this is it: Have nothing in your houses that you do not know to be useful or believe to be beautiful." -- William Morris, 1834-1896

    http://arkansasmanquilter.blogspot.com/

  5. #5
    Super Member Charlee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    PNW (I wish it was the Ozarks!)
    Posts
    6,510
    Blog Entries
    6
    Older machines often just said to remove the presser foot to embroider....FMQ was not a common form of machine quilting then. I've not tried it without the hopping foot, but have thought about it.
    That being said, you can get a darning/quilting foot at Hancock's or Joanne's for about $12...
    One day, you'll only be a memory for some people. Do your best to be a good one.

    http://charleeturner.blogspot.com

  6. #6
    Super Member Pam H's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    1,662
    I did try this once. Besides the fact that it is pretty scary with that bare needle, when the needle raises up it pulls your fabric up. You end up having to hold the fabric down while you are still trying to move it around. It really wasn't pretty.

  7. #7
    Super Member Prism99's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Western Wisconsin
    Posts
    9,702
    Blog Entries
    1
    For FMQ, most quilters use a "hopping" foot that has a spring in it. The foot holds the fabric down while the stitch is being formed, but hops back up in-between stitches so you can move the quilt. There is another type of FMQ foot that doesn't hop, but I've never used that one. As others have said, that one keeps a minimal amount of continual pressure on the sandwich to stop it from popping up when the needle moves up. These feet are usually not expensive at all. Most sewing machines have either a short shank or long shank, and a generic darning foot of the correct shank type is all that is needed.

    Oh, and it's not a stupid question at all! The only stupid question is the one that doesn't get asked.

  8. #8
    Power Poster Jingle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Outside St. Louis
    Posts
    23,972
    I don't know but, I'm sure there is a very good reason for it. I just follow directions.
    Another Phyllis
    This life is the only one you get - enjoy it before you lose it.

  9. #9
    Super Member luvTooQuilt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    A Hop from Heaven, a Skip from Sanity and a Jump from the Good Life....
    Posts
    7,123
    Blog Entries
    1
    A big messy thread blob... Not pretty..

  10. #10
    Power Poster amma's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Out searching for some sunshine :-)
    Posts
    59,111
    Blog Entries
    1
    My two newer machines don't sew well without a foot, my older one does well without. However, sewing without a foot is very intimidating as there isn't anything at all to protect your fingers/hands.
    I have done this for some decorative type stitching, but wouldn't for FMQ as you are moving the quilt sandwich around a lot and so much faster for that.
    Last edited by amma; 12-03-2011 at 09:50 PM.
    “The simplest toy, one which even the youngest child can operate, is called a grandparent.” Sam Levenson

Page 1 of 4 1 2 ... LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.