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Thread: Midarm quilting machine

  1. #1
    Junior Member
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    Looking to possibly get midarm quilting machine. What do yall recommend at resonable price?

  2. #2
    Super Member Quilter7x's Avatar
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    There's a search function at the top of the page. If you did a search, you might find the info you're looking for.

    Good luck with finding just what you're looking for! :thumbup:

  3. #3
    Super Member luckylindy333's Avatar
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    I'd get a longarm if I were you. I am taking lessons on a mid-arm, it is making me crazy!

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by luckylindy333
    I'd get a longarm if I were you. I am taking lessons on a mid-arm, it is making me crazy!
    what are the differences and how would one benefit over the other?

  5. #5
    Power Poster sewnsewer2's Avatar
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    Don't know if this info will help you, but I have a Juki and it's throat is 9". I have no trouble quilting a king size on it.

  6. #6
    Super Member Furza Flyin's Avatar
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    Went to a quilt show today and played on one of these. IT WAS AMAZING! It is a FM quilting machine that you sit at. It was only $4500 including the ajustable table. Here is a you-tube demo of it. It is called HQ Sweet Sixteen.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z4EHfo2WrHU

  7. #7
    Super Member quiltmaker's Avatar
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    I am not sure this is exactly correct but a longarm is generally considered 18"+ and the midarm is anything between 10" to 18".

    I also have a Juki TL98Q which has a 9" throat area and have no problems quilting a king size on it. It takes practice but can be done by bundling...it's really not that hard. I have a frame for it but actually prefer using it without it. The frame sits in a closet.

  8. #8
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    If you're going to be doing big quilts and don't want to wrestle with the quilt, I would go for a long arm or a "stretched" machine, like a Bailey, which are a whole lot less costly than a "true" long arm. I have an Elna Quilter's Dream which does have a lot of room under the throat, but I fight with big quilts which seem to be the only kind I can make. LOL

  9. #9
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    what you have to also consider is your space. I did not have room for a long-arm but my HQ16, which I love, fits beautifully in my sewing studio. I also don't worry that there is only about 16" of space to quilt (actually about 11" in terms of pantos). I meandered a king-sized quilt in less than 4 hours with NO pain!!!

  10. #10
    Super Member AliKat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nycquilter
    what you have to also consider is your space. I did not have room for a long-arm but my HQ16, which I love, fits beautifully in my sewing studio. I also don't worry that there is only about 16" of space to quilt (actually about 11" in terms of pantos). I meandered a king-sized quilt in less than 4 hours with NO pain!!!
    Yep, me too. I can only use it out to 8 ft or so as I don't have enough room for the full length. A friend made the table with locking wheels so the HQ stradles the day bed and a 2 drawer file cabinet in the studio. When I have guest I pull out the HQ to the other side of the room so the daybed is usable.

    I did get my HQ as gently used and thus it was more affordable for me.

    I know that sounds funny, but my sewing machines and cabinet are on the other side of the room, so I'm not using them at night when I have company.

    I didn't get the lower trundle for the daybed, so I put a skirt on the daybed and use wheeled bins to hold some of my professional references from my former lives and such under the daybed and no one can see it all.

    ali

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