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Thread: Need Your Help in Basics of Quiltmaking

  1. #101
    Power Poster Jingle's Avatar
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    I learned back in the 'olden' days and believe me I like making quilts the 'modern' way. I think all blocks would be perfect if made larger and trimmed down. Most 'experts' do not make quilts, just think they know the 'right' way to make them. I make my quilts to suit me, pattern or not, colors I like, etc. I have not made any heirloom quilts and I don't plan to. My quilts are for warmth, I thought that was what the whole idea was.I think the most important thing is to make them to please the maker.
    Another Phyllis
    This life is the only one you get - enjoy it before you lose it.

  2. #102
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    For me it is making sure to measure every step of the way, recheck cut pieces before and during block construction because material stretches while sewing, pressing no matter how careful you are. If your pieces are not accurate during construction, they will also be off at completion of blocks. Check and recheck is my motto.

  3. #103
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    My beginning quilt teacher in California taught us to look at a block and decide which pieces you could put together easily with straight seams and do that all the times they appear in the block, then decide which pieces you could add to those, etc. and because of that teaching, I have never been intimidated by any complicated block, and I have used that method in teaching my students, too.

  4. #104
    Super Member JUNEC's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by janRN View Post
    I started quilting in the "olden days" and learned with templates and scissors. Still do this occasionally. The thing I have the most trouble with is cutting long, straight strips. After years of fighting those crooked areas (dog legs?) I still get them. I fold, refold, press, line up, square up, pray, cut, and they still show up. Maybe this is too basic for your class but wow, would I like to know the secret of straight cuts. Especially when the strips are narrow, say 1 1/2" to 2 1/2" wide by WOF or LOF.
    That would be a great class to take. Learning rotary cutting & sewing a 1/4" seam - is a big help

    The first class I took, was not long enough to go over everything - only 3 classes - 3 hrs each - we had to do a lot of quilting at home to get it done - quilt project was very basic - various stipes sewn together than cut into 12" blocks.
    Next quilt made me realize the power of the 1/4" seam

  5. #105
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    On binding, it took me a long time to accomplish a good binding on a quilt.
    1. I wash fabric as soon as I bring it home on light cycle and dry in dryer. Remove dried fabric and fold the fabric in half opposite the way it comes off the bolt..salvage to salvage edge holding the fabric at the center of the cut. let it hang loose, and when it is hanging straight from the center..thats where you make your center line press. The ends maybe uneven thats ok. Once you have pressed the fabric with Spray Starch you can cut the bottom of the fabric on the straight of the grain at the bottom. then fold the fabric in half and in half again. you are now ready to cut your strips and the will be straight.
    2. cut strips to desired wideth. I use 2 1/2 in standard cut.
    3 double the fabric and spray starch and iron. I put the fabric wrong sides together on pressing matt and put in thru a large safety pin which holds your fold more easily. spray starch before you press. hold fabric with left hand and pull thru under the iron on the other side of the safety pin with fabric coming thru it.
    4. USE A WALKING FOOT to sew down the binding right sides together onto the front of the quilt 1/2 inch from the straight edge of the quilt. Start sewing 5 or 6 inches from the corner, also leave as much slack in your binding to work with when you get back to the beginning. { You must square up the quilt before you apply the binding}
    5.Corners can be mitered by sewing up to the corner of the quilt to 1/4th inch. Flip binding up to top of quilt. turn quilt. lay down binding to go the new direction of the quilt. Start sewing again coming down the edge 1/4in., back stitch a few stitches to the edge of the corner and then continue down the the next corner and repeat for all the corners.
    6Iron the binding seam like you would any other seam. back and front the mitered corners will fall into place when you press them out with iron.
    6 Hand stitch your binding down to the back of the quilt. I use a invisible applique stitch.
    Hope this may help some one else.

  6. #106
    Senior Member anita211's Avatar
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    Hi Holice,

    First, I love the wholecloth quilts that you design. I have made several, and have a couple to go.

    I guess that I would like to have down to earth hand quilting classes. I keep hearing even now that the stitiches must be like 9 - 10 stitches to an inch, and that overwhelms me, and I imaging a lot of others that do hand quilting. I have an Amish imspired top to quilt by hand, and want to do the best I can so that it becomes something of an article to pass down for posterity, not just something that I 'whipped' together because I could.

    Thanks much.

    Anita

  7. #107
    Junior Member countryone77's Avatar
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    I would like to visually see ALL the steps that are involved in converting a quilt top into a quilt. No one actually shows the various basting methods and their pros/cons for use in a home. It's somehow assumed that you know this in the directions, "Quilt as desired." I greatly enjoyed Holice's "Quilt as desired" video. Now I'd like something similar for basting a quilt.

    - straight pins with protector (e.g. Pinmoors), safety pins, spray/glue, thread basted with thread, wash away thread, etc).
    - on table or floor (using tapes & various kinds of clamps or pins), basting in a frame, with pieces of wood like Sharon Schamber, etc).
    - how do I physically handle all of this?
    I guess there could be a series of classes just on this topic.

    I also like the idea of learning about drafting quilts and quilt blocks.
    Bev in TX

  8. #108
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    When you fussy cut fabric to get just the right pattern in your piece, frequently you have a bias piece although the piece might actually be a square. Tell us how to best handle that.
    Last edited by TanyaL; 02-27-2012 at 12:44 PM.

  9. #109
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    Yes for sure how do you get them straight all the time without the fuss or fight?

  10. #110
    Super Member Rumbols's Avatar
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    I am completely self taught and have picked up different ways of doing the cutting, sewing, and general quilt making. I have learned a hodge podge of techniques but not enought of anyone to be consistant to create a great quilt. Would love to know the basics on accurate cutting, drafting, color, and piecing. It would be so nice not to have mismatched pieces, or elbows in the long strips. I couldn't go to classes but I could certainly take an on-line class if offered at a reasonable price.

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