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Thread: New to machine quilting--is there a fairly easy way to quilt a king size?

  1. #11
    Senior Member happyquiltmom's Avatar
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    The largest I've done is queen (only because I don't have a king sized bed). I quilt from the center outward toward the edges, bunching up the excess under the harp and constantly shifting the bulk as I move to a new area. I have an extra large table for resting the bulk of the quilt (both on the left and behind the machine) so that there is no drag, and I use Machingers gloves. Harriet Hargraves' book, Heirloom Machine Quilting, is a very helpful resource, as are Diane Gaudynski's books.
    Cindy

    Curator of an 1889 Singer model 27 Fiddlebase Treadle, a 1951 Singer Centennial Featherweight, a 1956 Singer 401A, and a 1982 Bernina 830 Record.

  2. #12
    Senior Member cherylmae's Avatar
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    Could just make your lines curve instead of being straight too?

  3. #13
    Power Poster nativetexan's Avatar
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    using a walking foot is an easy way to make easy curves. just move the quilt to the left then the right as you sew along. have fun!!

  4. #14
    Super Member Stitchnripper's Avatar
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    I did a king size on my dinky mechanical Brother. I did stitch in the ditch. The middle was tricky but I wasn't deterred and was happy with the results.

  5. #15
    Senior Member alisonquilts's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by happyquiltmom View Post
    ... I have an extra large table for resting the bulk of the quilt (both on the left and behind the machine) so that there is no drag, and I use Machingers gloves. Harriet Hargraves' book, Heirloom Machine Quilting, is a very helpful resource, as are Diane Gaudynski's books.
    Definitely get some Machingers gloves (or similar) - they will make a HUGE difference to how sore your shoulders get! And I second looking at Diane Gaudynski's books.

    Quote Originally Posted by nativetexan View Post
    using a walking foot is an easy way to make easy curves. just move the quilt to the left then the right as you sew along. have fun!!
    And I second nativetexan's point about walking feet - much much easier to work with than leaping straight into free motion quilting, and you can do quite a bit of curvy quilting with a walking foot.

    You can definitely make a beautiful quilt with two plain sheets, some thin batting and a bunch of straight lines: simple, clean, elegant. If it were me I would do that, and then (if I liked machine quilting) I'd move on to experimenting on a smaller quilt, where there isn't as much bulk to fight!

    Alison

    PS And I do all my machine quilting on a Kenmore mechanical domestic machine from the early 1980's - I have done several king size, quite a few queens and countless little 'uns - and I am entirely self taught. You can so do this!!

  6. #16
    Junior Member
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    You could always just tye it. That is the easiest method I know. I grew up sleeping under quilts that were 2 sheets and batting, tyed with yarn.

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