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Thread: (new topic) ? For Log cabiners & McCall's Quilting readers

  1. #1
    Super Member Cybrarian's Avatar
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    In the July/August 2011 McCalls Quilting is an interesting Log cabin pattern called"Radiance" by Renee Peterson. Log cabin is on my "Gonna Make It-Really I Am" list. Have done pineapple blocks but not log cabin-yet. Was really awed by this pattern...Now the rest of the story. The log cabin blocks are paper pieced. Now that's on the above mentioned list also--but NOT 152 blocks! I understand why the first border would be paper pieced (I might do something different), but I've looked at many log cabin patterns and have E. Burns book and none used paper piecing. The dimensions for cutting are larger to allow for the PP. Could the measurements for strips for a log cabin block that finishes 4 1/2" x 4 1/2" be used or is it because of the small size that it is paper pieced? Now that I think about it that is tiny! Maybe use the bright colors/with black idea in larger blocks and cut down the number of rows? Log cabin experts--input?

  2. #2
    MTS
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    http://www.mccallsquilting.com/articles/Radiance

    If those blocks finish at 4.5", then you want to PP.
    It looks - and it's a bit hard to see - like there are 9 rounds -
    that means each strip finishes at .5".

    Log Cabin blocks have a tendency to go off kilter, and with the strips this small, it's even more likely. By PP, you're avoiding all the squaring up after each round (or strip) because the paper will guide the placement.

    If you've never done PP, do a sample block to get the hang of it. But once you break it down, you can even chain piece it.
    Looks like there are 16 blocks of each color.

    You just need to be organized when at the machine.
    Actually, I think a regular log cabin block is easier than the pineapple.

  3. #3
    Super Member auntpiggylpn's Avatar
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    All of my log cabin blocks are paper pieced because if I do them the old fashioned way, my blocks come out wonky. Can't draw a straight line, can't sew a straight line!!! I have never done a quilt of log cabin blocks, only table runners and wall hangings. It is on my bucket list, though

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    Senior Member cedarvalleyquilts's Avatar
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    Cute design.....I love to paper piece, but I don't think I'd ever do a log cabin paper pieced (or even foundation pieced)...and I love to make log cabins. As long as your strips are cut accurately, that's the main thing. E. Burns' book on log cabins is great resource. Just decide what size block you want to end up with and use that Radiance pattern for your color inspiration.

    Christine

  5. #5
    Super Member Gramie bj's Avatar
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    I have made several log cabins and never paper pieced a one. I use Elenor Burns Log Cabin quilt in a day. it uses strips and you cut as you go. I have used strips 1 1/2 inches and up. If I tryed anything smaler I would Paperpiece for more control.

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    That is a beautiful quilt. I love to paper piece. You organize yourself and it goes along smoothly. And the precision is wel" worth it. Pat

  7. #7
    Super Member Cybrarian's Avatar
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    Thanks for all the helpful insight. I can definitely see the help of accuracy and control in a 4.5 block. The thought of removing the paper from and producing 152 paper patterns is daunting to say the least. I have no real PP knowledge-no idea the best paper to use etc. I know you should use a shorter stitch length, but not what that should be, 2.0? 1.5? I know there are water soluble papers, but 152 blocks? Along with the 17.5 yards (!) of fabric this project would take- Definitely not in my budget! I am going to think on this and how I could use Eleanor's teaching to come up with a smaller project but use the color inspiration as Christine suggested. Thanks!

  8. #8
    Senior Member hevemi's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cybrarian
    Thanks for all the helpful insight. I can definitely see the help of accuracy and control in a 4.5 block. The thought of removing the paper from and producing 152 paper patterns is daunting to say the least. I have no real PP knowledge-no idea the best paper to use etc. I know you should use a shorter stitch length, but not what that should be, 2.0? 1.5? I know there are water soluble papers, but 152 blocks? Along with the 17.5 yards (!) of fabric this project would take- Definitely not in my budget! I am going to think on this and how I could use Eleanor's teaching to come up with a smaller project but use the color inspiration as Christine suggested. Thanks!
    Try this
    http://classicquilter.typepad.com/cl...r-piecing.html
    I have a big box full of 4.5" log gabin blocks made this way. I make these and 6" cabins all the time with scraps when I can't find anything better to do. No tearing off the papers, freezer paper templates can be used as many times as they stick on when ironed and regular stitch length ( great if you have to rip, ask me ...)

  9. #9
    MTS
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cybrarian
    Thanks for all the helpful insight. I can definitely see the help of accuracy and control in a 4.5 block. The thought of removing the paper from and producing 152 paper patterns is daunting to say the least. I have no real PP knowledge-no idea the best paper to use etc. I know you should use a shorter stitch length, but not what that should be, 2.0? 1.5? I know there are water soluble papers, but 152 blocks? Along with the 17.5 yards (!) of fabric this project would take- Definitely not in my budget! I am going to think on this and how I could use Eleanor's teaching to come up with a smaller project but use the color inspiration as Christine suggested. Thanks!
    I was going to suggest freezer paper or vellum(my preference). I really don't mind the ripping as it's not a big deal.

    You would be able to print two foundations per regular vellum sheet.

    I buy the 11x17 pads at Office Depot, and depending on the size of the foundations I'll be using, I either cut the sheets in half with the slicer in the copy department for printing at home, or I make the copies on the larger paper on the copy machines (and copy 4 at a time) - total cost either way is under $20. But the time and ease of doing it that way is worth it to me.

    With the freezer paper, which is also a great technique, you could needle punch the layout if you don't want to bother printing it out.
    I do that a lot - 8-10 sheets at a time.

    It's a great looking quilt. Looking forward to seeing your progress.

  10. #10

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    Thanks for 'pointing out' this quilt to me. I love anything to do with Log Cabins. Quilts/cabins/woods....after looking at the link I will 'need' to do this one. Thanks, I think :wink:

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