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Thread: olefin??

  1. #1
    Super Member wildyard's Avatar
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    Ok here is a question for all of you. In deconstructing bed skirts for fabrics to add to my stash, I am finding a bonus is that many have a high quality of cotton for the foundation. This is usually white, or offwhite. However, some come with a foundation of this washable material called olefin. I looked it up and it is considered a fabric, and can be used in making clothing and other items.
    I know it would serve as good foundation fabric, but I don't really have a need for that. My question is: Would this lightweight strong material be good to use as the batting in a light quilt? We do not like heavy quilts, especially throw size ones, and it seems to me this might be just what I need.
    Opinions?

  2. #2
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    The downside to using this in a quilt is that it will melt like plastic does if it should be in a fire.

  3. #3
    Super Member wildyard's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Joyce
    The downside to using this in a quilt is that it will melt like plastic does if it should be in a fire.
    Ah, thanks. That is not a good thing. LOL. Any suggestions what one might use it for? I have it in bedsized sheets and hate to just throw it away.

  4. #4
    Super Member ghostrider's Avatar
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    It's the same thing as polypropylene and polyethylene and has a very low melting point. It would make a great weed barrier in your garden! :D

  5. #5
    Super Member wildyard's Avatar
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    dang, why do they call it material/fabric if it's dumb plastic??
    It does have little holes in it for air and water to move thru, lol, gardens here it comes.

  6. #6
    Senior Member Twilliebee's Avatar
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    HI Linda,
    Check this out: http://www.fabrics.net/amyolefin.asp. Sounds like it can be made to feel like anything, and if they could get the low-melting point issue solved it would be a good thing.
    Too bad. I looked into polyester and apparently the different in terms of usage for quilts etc would be the different melting points. Polyester resists ignition, but of course burns like the dickens when it does ignite.
    And interesting tidbit from the same site: cotton has a very high burn rate, so mixed together cotton/poly's are damaging when burning than each individually. The cotton's high burn rate makes the poly ignite faster and the poly still melts. Not a pretty picture, huh?
    Sorry this is so long. Somedays my curiousity gets the better of me!

  7. #7
    Super Member wildyard's Avatar
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    TY Twilliebee for the link and info. I might use some of it as lining for a wall hanging I am making. If it burns hanging on the wall, it was a goner anyway, I'd think. It was interesting to read about. Never too old to learn. Smiles and hugs, Linda

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