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Thread: Potholders

  1. #1
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    I'd like to make a batch of potholders using some of my orphan blocks left over from quilts. Made my sandwiches and bound it, just like a quilt, but spent some time sewing my teeny stiches to hold down the binding. At this rate, I'll never finish. Anyone have a quicker way to make them?

  2. #2
    Super Member dotcomdtcm's Avatar
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    I was taught to put the binding on by machine . I think hand sewing always finishes it nicer but couldn't you use a nice zig zag or embroidery stitch? These sound too nice to get greasy. Maybe mug rugs?

  3. #3
    Senior Member judee0624's Avatar
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    You don't have to do a binding at all, just stich around the potholder about 1/4 inch inside the edge. A decorative stitch would be nice but not necessary.

    judee

  4. #4
    Super Member OHSue's Avatar
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    I have done them just by sewing them inside out and flipping them the right way. But I was given some with the handstitched binding, and it really does look nicer.

  5. #5
    Super Member Lori S's Avatar
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    A completely machine stitched binding is the most efficient way of doing potholder bindings. If fact when it comes to potholder I do the binding in reverse . I sew the bindling on the back side first , then bring over the fold to the right side and top stitch it down. It is the fastest way I know to do a potholder binding.
    If you want even more speed once the binding is sewn on the back ..use a skinny strip of fusible ( light) on the right side ..in what would be the seam area ( use 1/4 inch strip or less) to hold the binding in place, then just zip around it with the edge with a top stitch. The fusible beats the heck out of pinning.

  6. #6
    Senior Member QUILT4JOY's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lori S
    A completely machine stitched binding is the most efficient way of doing potholder bindings. If fact when it comes to potholder I do the binding in reverse . I sew the bindling on the back side first , then bring over the fold to the right side and top stitch it down. It is the fastest way I know to do a potholder binding.
    If you want even more speed once the binding is sewn on the back ..use a skinny strip of fusible ( light) on the right side ..in what would be the seam area ( use 1/4 inch strip or less) to hold the binding in place, then just zip around it with the edge with a top stitch. The fusible beats the heck out of pinning.
    Right On!!! I find that as a pot holder, any way you want to do it is fine. No one ever spends time studying their pot holders :lol: :lol:

  7. #7
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    Machine stitching the binding would make the potholder more durable. However, over all the years that I've crafted in craft fairs, I simply sewed right sides together (make sure to include the batting). Leave an opening on the bottom to turn. Turn, press, hand stitch the opening closed. Top stitch as desired.

    Insulbrite is a great batting to use.

  8. #8
    Super Member Kitsapquilter's Avatar
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    I have just been making pot holders/candle mats and I sewed the binding onto the wrong side first then turned it to the front and machine stitched. It didn't come out perfect on the back but it isn't that bad and who is going to care. I am sure not hand stitching on potholders!! I cut my binding 2 1/4" wide and then folded it half, used a 1/4"seam to sew it on. It looks okay on the back to me!

  9. #9
    Super Member miss_ticky2's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lori S
    A completely machine stitched binding is the most efficient way of doing potholder bindings. If fact when it comes to potholder I do the binding in reverse . I sew the bindling on the back side first , then bring over the fold to the right side and top stitch it down. It is the fastest way I know to do a potholder binding.
    I do the same too

  10. #10
    FortMyers's Avatar
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    Same here, I have even done my smaller wall quilts this way using the fancy stitches on my machine when sewing done the front side.

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