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Thread: Practise quilting at home - new innovative idea

  1. #1
    Super Member d.rickman's Avatar
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    Practise quilting at home - new innovative idea

    If you would like to practise your own quilting, at home, without making quilting sandwichs, or using your sewing machine, or your quilting gloves, no paper, and no videos. All you will need is a table and chair to sit upon.

    I ordered this practising method, and was so impressed the first time I tried it out, and now I have enough confidence to do my own quilting. She will provide you with 12 designs, along with her innovative pkg, and also included will be all that you need, except for a couple of white board pens.
    '
    I highly recommend this method if you would like to improve your quilting skills, or just beginning to think about doing your own quilting.

    Please get more information from gloria@laliladesign.com
    Quilting People are the Best, Have a great sewing day!
    DonnaJ

  2. #2
    Super Member dunster's Avatar
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    I saw this at Road2CA. I personally didn't think it would be any more helpful than drawing with a pen or pencil. For the DSM (without a stitch regulator), much of the practice that you need has to do with getting a smooth motion, timing that motion with the speed of the needle to get even stitches. This method doesn't help with that aspect. It might help if you need to practice moving the fabric (paper) instead of the pencil. For the longarm, this tool requires that you hold the "handles" up over the table at just the right height to get the pen to the paper, without wobbling the tool, which I think would be very tiring, whereas with the longarm the handles are already at the right height and you are just moving them around. I could be wrong though and others might find the setup helpful. Here's the web address - http://laliladesign.com/

  3. #3
    Power Poster mighty's Avatar
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    I purchased it also and am very impressed. It is helping me alot!!!!!!!! I highly recommend it also!!!!!

  4. #4
    Super Member kiffie2413's Avatar
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    Thanks for the info! Are y'all using them for the domestic machine, or the long arm? I would be getting it for a domestic..I just got my "dream" machine a Janome Horizon 7700...and I really want to get the hang of fmq down...
    Kif
    In the garden of life everyone has a row to hoe, some people just have more weeds...

    Always do right, it will gratify some and astonish the rest...Mark Twain

  5. #5
    Junior Member
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    I may have completely missed the point and am being very unfair, but this thread sounds to me like an advertisement, not a discussion. Sorry.
    Maggie in Jerusalem
    http://www.etsy.com/shop/maggiemwdesigns

  6. #6
    Super Member
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    I don't see it as an 'advertisement'. A lot of people put links to things they want to try or have tried in case others might be interested. I'm always open to suggestions for anything that might help make me a better quilter - and I need lots of help!

  7. #7
    Super Member thimblebug6000's Avatar
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    It looks kind of like one of those arcade machines we used to plop our quarters into I guess it's really more for long arm training? http://laliladesign.com/Quik-Trainer...ngarm-QT-L.htm

  8. #8
    Super Member d.rickman's Avatar
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    I have this system and it really worked for me, just taught my brain the rythm and movement of my arms in FMQ, having all the different patterns was also very helpful, and I have found that I am more confident in doing my own top
    stitching. I do not have a long arm, but works for me on my domestic machine. I am getting ready to do a king size
    quilt, and not having to send it out to a LA is a big step for me. So far have done lap sized quilts, and wall hangings.
    This was not an advertisement, but wanting to share my experience with others. I wasn't happy having to make sandwichs with my expensive fabric, batting, etc. When we pay $18 - 20/m, I didn't want to be cutting it up for practise pieces. Practising on paper I was only using one arm and hand, so didn't find that worked for me either.
    Quilting People are the Best, Have a great sewing day!
    DonnaJ

  9. #9
    Junior Member
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    Kinda looks like PVC pipe with a hole for a marker (though I'm sure it's not made of PVC). Could be helpful in practicing though. And this is something you could bring with you and practice while waiting at the Dr.'s office or dentist or something.

  10. #10
    Super Member peaceandjoy's Avatar
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    It's made of metal and trains your mind and hands to work the same as they will when quilting... The motion is the same as when you are doing FMQ on your DMS. You are moving the plastic as you will move the fabric under the needle. I did look at it for a while and thought there should be a way to make one, but didn't figure one out, so finally purchased this. It came promptly and is helping with what I thought was hopeless..

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