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Thread: Prairie points from one length of fabric, is it possible?

  1. #1
    Senior Member Butterfli19's Avatar
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    Or do you have to make them one at a time? There has to be a way you can make them from a length of fabric so they automatically connect, right? Or was that in a dream I had...

    Any ideas?

  2. #2
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    As far as I know Prairie points are made individually...at least that is how I made mine. :)

  3. #3
    Super Member Prism99's Avatar
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    There is a way to make them from a single length of fabric; however, it's been several years since I studied that method. I will see if I can find it on the net somewhere. I know I have seen it in more than one book.
    ......... (time lapse)
    Okay, I did a search and came up with this website:

    http://tinyurl.com/2dbnlp

    When I Googled how to make prairie points I came up with other websites too, but this seemed to have the clearest explanation. While surfing the other sites, I noticed that there are different ways to fold prairie points so they can look different depending on your method.

  4. #4
    Super Member Mamagus's Avatar
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    Definitely can do it in one piece - it is SO neat. I'll see if I can find the link for you!
    When I learned how to do it I would cut up fabric just for the fun of it!

    Here's one link: http://www.quiltersbee.com/Prairie.htm

    But here's a better one: http://www.freespiritquiltguild.com/...iriePoints.pdf

  5. #5
    Senior Member Butterfli19's Avatar
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    Thank you so much! I'll definitely give these a try!

  6. #6
    Community Manager PatriceJ's Avatar
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    unless i'm missing something, the instructions at all these links also result in individual prairie points. :? :?:

  7. #7
    Super Member mary quite contrary's Avatar
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    Thank you Patrice because I thought I was missing something. You still end up with a square that you fold and fold again right?

  8. #8
    community benefactor Knot Sew's Avatar
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    Prarie points are easy but slow...I have not tried the long piece, but so far mine have been mixed color :D

  9. #9
    Super Member Prism99's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PatriceJ
    unless i'm missing something, the instructions at all these links also result in individual prairie points. :? :?:
    Well, the end result is that they appear to be individual prairie points, but in fact they are strings of connected prairie points. If you look at the diagram, the initial strip is ironed so that there is a crease running down the center when it is opened up. The cuts are only to the crease. Since the cuts from the top are offset from the cuts at the bottom, the strip is never severed. Before folding, you do have to remove the two ends that aren't wide enough to fold.

    I think the confusion may come from the picture. That crease down the middle of the strip is *not* a cutting line. They should have made that a dotted line so it didn't look the same as the cuts you make.

    After you fold the first square on top, you fold the next square on the bottom and tuck it into the previous prairie point. The next square would be one folded from the top, and you would tuck that one into the previously folded one from the bottom.

    Once all the prairie points are folded and tucked into one another, you have a long line of connected prairie points. The edge is that middle part of the strip which is now a fold. You can baste that edge to make sure you keep your spacing and that nothing unfolds before the edge is secured by the seam that attaches it to the edge of the quilt.

    Hope this helps some! :D

  10. #10
    Power Poster Mousie's Avatar
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    i'm so glad I just saw this very thing somewhere...maybe I was looking at books online, otherwise i probably wouldn't have had a clue what you guys were talking about.
    I want to make a tote bag that has prairie points on the top edge and this looks like the best way.
    Prism99 you explain things well. I agree, a solid line would make you think you should cut there instead of fold. i might do some practicing with ppr before i tackle it. thanks you guys! good luck, umm, butterfywing? too bad they don't put posters name on replies. :wink:

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