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Thread: pre-quilted fabric question

  1. #1
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    I am planning a small project and I wondered if I use prequilted fabric, do I need to grade the seams? Has anyone worked with this before? Thanks for your help.

  2. #2
    Super Member mpspeedy's Avatar
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    I'm not sure what seams you would have to grade. I have made Linus quilts with prequilted fabrics. I used a piece of prequilted fabric the size I wanted the finished quilt. I appliqued something or couched some kind of decorative yarn on them and bound them. I make a point to purchase fusable appliques at Joanns or where ever when they go on clearance. They make great decorations for prequilted simple quilts. The fabrics I used had finished backs.

  3. #3
    Super Member Prism99's Avatar
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    Are you planning to piece the prequilted fabric? If so, I think you might want to press the seams open rather than grade them.

  4. #4
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    I am making a seat belt cover. Instead of making a fabric sandwich with batting, I thought I could streamline the process with quilted fabric. The front has a small pieced design which I thought I would back with batting and use the pre-quilted for the rest. I got the pattern from The Quilt Show--Carol Doak free project. http://www.thequiltshow.com I need to make some quick boutique items for our quilt show in March. I was thinking about the seams being too bulky when I posted the question. Perhaps I should get the double sided and not have two seam two pieces?

    I love the charity quilt idea. Wow I always seem to do things the hard way.

  5. #5
    Super Member mpeters1200's Avatar
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    I'm curious about pre-quilted fabric as well. I've never used it before...only seen it rolled on the bolt. I have a pattern for a casserole cover I want to make, I thought it would be good *and faster* to use pre-quilted fabric and bind it.

    Any suggestions? Anyone use pre-quilted fabrics for smaller projects like placemats or casserole covers?

  6. #6
    Super Member Favorite Fabrics's Avatar
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    I've used pre-quilted solids (by Springs) to make appliance covers. And - this is just my experience - I was not pleased. The threads that are used to do the quilting are slippery, and so they worked their way out of the seams; with successive laundrings there were a lot of loose threads. You can do a teeny-tiny straight stitch along all the cut ends, which will help to hold the quilting threads down. But it's extra work.

    I'd be interested to know if other people have had this problem and if so, what they did.

  7. #7
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    I am new to this and wondered if you pre washed the fabric before sewing

  8. #8
    Senior Member MdmSew'n'Sew's Avatar
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    When I use prequilted fabrics, I do a French seam - first put back sides together, stitch a very narrow seam, then fold right sides together and stitch just outside the edge of the seam that is encased in the seam - hard to explain, you can google it and see tutes - it will keep the edges from fraying, and leave you with a nice clean finish. Another alternative (but more time-consuming) is to bind all raw edges with bias tape, like you would bind a quilt, except you can SID the second side when you turn it, then just make a regular seam - either way works.
    He who cuts his own wood is warmed twice, but she who makes her own quilt is warmed forever - SLR 11/7/2011

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