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Thread: Preventing side triangles stretching

  1. #1
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    Preventing side triangles stretching

    Is it ok to stay stitch bias edges or would it be better to starch?
    Molly O

  2. #2
    Senior Member humbird's Avatar
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    I might do both, but would avoid bias to start with.

  3. #3
    Super Member LucyInTheSky's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by humbird View Post
    I might do both, but would avoid bias to start with.
    Agree. Avoid the bias - it's easier to work with! Are you doing setting triangles? If so, just cut them along both diagonals and then when they lay against the quilt, you don't have bias edges. Problem solved.
    Nothing's a mistake. It's a learning experience. Some experiences, you learn more than others.

  4. #4
    Moderator QuiltnNan's Avatar
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    heavy starching works fine, but you still have to handle the block carefully. i've never tried stay-stitching, but, oddly enough, i was thinking about that very thing this morning.
    Nancy in western NY

  5. #5
    Super Member Lori S's Avatar
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    Starch... I have actually stretched the edges just by trying to stay stitch. If you do choose to stay stitch.. use your walking foot.

  6. #6
    Super Member Peckish's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lori S View Post
    Starch... I have actually stretched the edges just by trying to stay stitch. If you do choose to stay stitch.. use your walking foot.
    Ditto, I too have stretched the edges by stay stitching. I've had more success with starching the snot out of the fabric BEFORE I cut it into triangles. If you starch and press AFTER, you run the risk of stretching the bias as you're pressing.

    As others have said, you might also try cutting your triangles so the long edge is on the grain instead of the bias.

  7. #7
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    Thanks to all for your suggestions.
    Molly O

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    Super Member jcrow's Avatar
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    I have the worse time with working with bias. My flying geese are the worst. I never thought about using starch. Duh! And I'm glad someone said to starch it BEFORE you cut it. Maybe I'll finish my quilt that had lots of flying geese.
    "Be yourself...everyone else is taken."
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  9. #9
    Senior Member IAmCatOwned's Avatar
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    I would starch it before cutting. After cutting, it would be pretty hard to prevent introducing more stretch with your iron.
    Current piecing: Zig Zag quilt & LOTL (HSTs done, assembling units)
    Hand piecing project: Apple core (TOP IS DONE!!!! Yay!)

  10. #10
    Power Poster MadQuilter's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jcrow View Post
    I have the worse time with working with bias. My flying geese are the worst. I never thought about using starch. Duh! And I'm glad someone said to starch it BEFORE you cut it. Maybe I'll finish my quilt that had lots of flying geese.
    I use the method that starts with a rectangle (no bias) and you sew down a square on the diagonal (no bias). Then you trim the excess and press the triangle back.
    Martina
    Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit of Fabric!

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