Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 14

Thread: Problem with hand quilting in hoop - tiddlywinking needle.

  1. #1
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Cooperstown, NY
    Posts
    217
    Blog Entries
    2

    Problem with hand quilting in hoop - tiddlywinking needle.

    So...I finally finished the wall hanging for my quilt club exchange (only 2 months late but it's for my friend and she understands). I started hand quilting in my usual way (on my lap, squashing up the fabric in one hand and running stitch with the other), but I was reading that it will come out better if I use a hoop. So my local quilt store lady very kindly loaned me her own q-snap frame and last night I tried for hours to quilt it.

    I had the book "That Perfect Stitch" open beside me and was following the directions in it. On each first stitch, when I tried to bring the point of the needle up to the top, it would jump off the quilt (I was holding the end with my thimble finger as instructed) just like a tiddlywink. The only way that it wouldn't was if I took a really big stitch. I don't think the quilt was too tight in the frame - there is a lot of hand applique and embroidery in it and I couldn't make it tight. After 2 hours, I had only done about 2 inches of quilting.

    I ended up taking it out of the frame and going back to my old method.

    What was I doing wrong? And how important is it to use a frame. Is my squished up fabric, no hoop method, so bad? It is not a huge quilt, only a wall hanging. Has anyone else ever had this problem?

    I would REALLY appreciate any help or opinions! Thanks, everyone, in advance.

    Lorli

  2. #2
    Super Member Prism99's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Western Wisconsin
    Posts
    9,931
    Blog Entries
    1
    It sounds to me as if the quilt was too tight in the frame. The purpose of the frame is simply to prevent fabric from puckering. In terms of looseness for a hand quilting frame, you want at least a fistful of "give" in the center. That is, the center should be able to move about 5 inches below to 5 inches above the frame. It shouldn't look like a drum; it should sag at least a little in the middle.

  3. #3
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Cooperstown, NY
    Posts
    217
    Blog Entries
    2
    Thank you, I guess it was too tight after all (the LQS lady showed me how to put it in, but maybe she didn't account for the heavy applique). I will try it again.

    I do wonder if there is much difference between quilts made with a hoop/frame and those made on the lap.

  4. #4
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Cooperstown, NY
    Posts
    217
    Blog Entries
    2
    P.S. It could move only about 2 inches in the center. I forgot to say.

  5. #5
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Central NJ
    Posts
    2,741
    Well, you've gotten good advice here and your LQS as to how tight to have your quilt in the hoop. There's nothing wrong with not using a hoop. I do it both ways depending on how large/heavy the quilt is. I like using a hoop if for no other reason than an easy way to find where I left off stitching. And you can still do your 'running' stitch using the hoop. Find the rhythm that works for you. As long as your stitches are consistent size doesn't matter. They will get smaller over time.

  6. #6
    Super Member Prism99's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Western Wisconsin
    Posts
    9,931
    Blog Entries
    1
    If you can do nice hand quilting without a hoop, there's really no big advantage to using a frame or hoop. I have tried quilting without a hoop, but I found the bunching to be hard on my hands, and my stitches were not even (especially underneath). I like using a lap hoop (mine swivels on a ball and is very easy to adjust to any angle and direction. By hooping very loosely as I described, it's a little similar to quilting without a hoop in that it's still easy to manipulate the fabric layers onto the needle.

  7. #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Lived in San Diego now retired in Eagar, AZ.
    Posts
    854
    Blog Entries
    1
    Don't be afraid to quilt without a hoop, lots of people do it (I'm one..) it only requires close basting 4" squares, and working from the middle outward... and if you have started quilting this do NOT change methods in the middle.... seriously... this is quite common...

  8. #8
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    dallas tx.
    Posts
    3,690
    Blog Entries
    3
    If you are using the plastic pipe frame you must have give in thecenter. You will never get that needle back up if it is too tight. Use that finger underneath to push it back up. You can do it.

  9. #9
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Topeka, KS
    Posts
    3,702
    I have only hand quilted two quilts so I certainly do not have the expertise that others have. I used the PVC type of rectangular hoop and started in the middle of the quilt. It was comfortable for me to quilt that way and I was sure I wouldn't shift the batting and backing while I was quilting. I had basted and pinned the quilt but I didn't think what I did stabilized the sandwich enough. I tried machine quilting one of the quilts but ended up taking all that out because the backing bunched up a lot.
    If you get a satisfactory product not using a hoop, I say do what you like. I am sure your quilts are really beautiful and the sandwich is fine. If I get more experience, maybe I could do it that way, also.

  10. #10
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    597
    Blog Entries
    1
    I have been handquilting for many years and prefer to use a hoop on a stand, however, if I am working on a very small project I squish it up and quilt without a hoop. My advice to you: use whatever method you are comfortable with. Handquilting is handquilting no matter how it is accomplished. Nice to meet another handquilter. Good luck with your project.

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.