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Thread: Pulled Seams

  1. #1
    Junior Member The Bag Lady's Avatar
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    I don't know if anyone has had this problem,but here is what happened. After I brought my quilt home from being long arm quilted, I noticed two pulled seams. I don't know how it happened unless the long arm machine stretces the fabric and pulls it. But here is what I did---I took some stitch witchery and put it in the seams and fused it together. Now it all blends in together again. After I finished t he quilt top I checked it over very carefully and repaired things where needed, before I took it to the shop. So I am bafled by the pulled seams.

  2. #2
    Moderator kathy's Avatar
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    I don't really understand what you mean by pulled, but yes when you put it on a frame for quilting it does pull it taut, it should not stretch anything out of shape or pull apart a seam unless it wasn't secured well and then I think it would only happen on the ends.

  3. #3
    Super Member MaryKatherine's Avatar
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    No, pulled seams can happen at any interior corner. If the fabrics had different degrees of give and/or are turned in the blocks there is uneven give across the surface. An observant LA quilter will notice and adjust but it is troublesome to work at one tension and then find a spot that needs TLC. I think this is one of the arguments LAQ's have for not mixing your fibres in a quilt.

  4. #4
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    This can happen if the seam allowances aren't a 1/4", as a longarmer will roll it tight to prevent tucks when quilting. I see it a lot in older quilts esp hand pieced. Idon't roll them as tight.

  5. #5
    Power Poster amma's Avatar
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    This is all good to know, thank you for asking this question, and for all of the answers :D:D:D

  6. #6
    Junior Member The Bag Lady's Avatar
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    Kathy the seams pulled apart. I don't know how much plainer I can explain. It separated and I did backtitch all my seams.

  7. #7
    Junior Member The Bag Lady's Avatar
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    Thanks for all your answers. I figured it happened on the LA. Maybe the fabrics slipped when i was sewing it too---I don't know.

  8. #8
    tooMuchFabric's Avatar
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    I have taken to making a two-stitch backstitch in my lock stitches on the end of seams, because I've found that just taking one backstitch sometimes is not enough if the piece is later stretched.
    Seems to help.
    '


    Quote Originally Posted by The Bag Lady
    Kathy the seams pulled apart. I don't know how much plainer I can explain. It separated and I did backtitch all my seams.

  9. #9
    Super Member EasyPeezy's Avatar
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    What stitch length did you use for piecing?

  10. #10
    Super Member ckcowl's Avatar
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    when your quilt is 'loaded' to be long-arm quilted it is stretched tight and smooth across the quilting area. this puts lots of tension on the seams in a pieced quilt. i have noticed often interior seams pull apart. i usually try to 'fix' them as i quilt but at times it is too much for the quilting to take care of it. in those places i put some sort of (mark) to identify the spot so repair can be done after the quilting. it can be from thread breaking as easily as from not being secure in the first place. i try to kind of pull on areas of my piecing to make sure seams are not coming apart while i am constructing so i can identify problem areas before loading it on the frame. your fix sounds like a good one.

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