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Thread: a question about applique

  1. #1
    bj
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    I'm doing a boot block for a quilt guild project, and I haven't really done much applique. I bought some of the heat and bond lite to attach the pieces with...here's my question...is it better to sew the bond to right side of fabric, clip, and turn so the raw edges are already turned under? Or will it be too bulky. I figured to use pinking shears to trim to stitch line before turning.

  2. #2
    lin
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    I don't think an adherent like Heat 'n Bond is what you're needing if you're wishing to sew something to the applique piece to turn the edges under. Heat 'n Bond is a glue that is ironed onto the wrong side of the fabric and then when you turn the applique piece over you iron it to your background fabric and either hand stitch something like a blanket stitch or machine stitch using a decorative stitch.

    If you're wanting to sew something to the applique pieces and then turn them so that the edges are already turned under, then you need to use a lightweight fabric or even something like a used dryer sheet. I used to use old dryer sheets for this method when I first began appliqueing, before I learned needle turn technique.

    I would simply lay the cut out applique piece to the dryer sheet (right side of fabric down) and then stitch all around the shape about " in, make a slit in the back of the dryer sheet and turn it right side out, and then press the applique piece well and pin it to my background fabric for stitching.

  3. #3
    bj
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    Yeah. I figured I bought the wrong stuff now that I've taken it out of the package. Maybe the product I saw someone mention was something called lightweight fusible webbing? The dryer sheets also sound like a good idea, but was hoping to find something that would also kindof stick the pieces in place so they'd be more secure when I stitch around. I am totally clueless about this whole process. But I guess you have to try to learn.

  4. #4
    Super Member Yvonne's Avatar
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    Eleanor Burns uses a method with a one sided heat and bond material. She stitches it to the applique piece, turns it and then irons it down and then does the applique stitch around the whole thing. The edges are already turned for you. Sounds like it ought to work. Having the piece bonded to the background while you stitch is bound to be a plus.

  5. #5
    Community Manager PatriceJ's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bj
    Yeah. I figured I bought the wrong stuff now that I've taken it out of the package. Maybe the product I saw someone mention was something called lightweight fusible webbing?
    get some Stitch Witchery. it's very lightweight. you'll be able to sew and turn. just don't make the mistake of pressing your turned edges until you're ready to bond it to the background. (don't ask me how i know that. please! :shock: :lol: )

  6. #6

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    I use a lite weight fuseable, to all my appliques, Applique right side down on unshiny side of fuseable, stitch 1/4 " around, all the way around applique piece, make a slit in the fuseable center and turn the piece right side out. Makes all edges neat, and the sticky side, (shiny side of the fuseable is ready and you just press the applique in place, and the sticky holds it. Works on big and small appliques very well. Then choose the stitch you want to make it permanent.

  7. #7
    bj
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    Thanks everyone for your input. I went back and got a featherweight fusible and am going to try that. I bought plenty, so if a I mess up I can try again. Patrice, they didn't have any of the product you suggested. Said they were just out of it, but I'm working on a deadline and I'm slowwwww.

  8. #8
    lin
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    I've never used stitch witchery or heard of the product used by Eleanor Burns but they both sound like just what you're looking for bj! I had no idea that stitch witchery was the kind you sewed on and then pressed. I need to get out more!! :lol: :lol:

    Thanks for your imput Patrice and Yvonne. I love getting new info. :)

  9. #9
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    seems to me i've seen this done with fusible interfacing (lightweight). stitch it, turn it, press it, then stitch around it?

  10. #10
    stay-at-home's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rebecca Chambley
    I use a lite weight fuseable, to all my appliques, Applique right side down on unshiny side of fuseable, stitch 1/4 " around, all the way around applique piece, make a slit in the fuseable center and turn the piece right side out. Makes all edges neat, and the sticky side, (shiny side of the fuseable is ready and you just press the applique in place, and the sticky holds it. Works on big and small appliques very well. Then choose the stitch you want to make it permanent.
    this sounds great! Thanks!

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