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Thread: Question about blind stitching

  1. #1
    Super Member EagarBeez's Avatar
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    I am doing a quilt by hand and putting the blocks together. When I put the blocks together I am using a blind stitch. I want to know if I am doing something wrong or not.
    When I put the block together, nothing shows, however if I pull on the blocks a little bit, I am seeing small spaces.
    Am I doing this ok?
    Thanks for the input
    Brenda

  2. #2
    Power Poster sandpat's Avatar
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    I hesitate to answer you because I'm self taught and don't even know if I do it right....but, when I hand piece.....I use a running stitch. I only use a blind stitch when I am hand appliqueing or sewing the binding down on the back.

    I hope you get more answers than mine...EEEKKKK...I might just be doing it wrong too!

  3. #3
    Power Poster Ninnie's Avatar
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    I think you should be using a running stitch, (small) a blind stitch is too loose!

    :D Ninnie

  4. #4
    Power Poster Ninnie's Avatar
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    I think you should be using a running stitch, (small) a blind stitch is too loose!

    :D Ninnie

  5. #5
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    i'm with ninnie - you should use a running stitch to piece the block and to join them to each other.

    the blind stitch is more suitable for binding, hanging sleeve, quilt label, applique, etc.

  6. #6
    Moderator littlehud's Avatar
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    I agree, a running stitch is your best bet.

  7. #7
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    I use a very fine "running" stitch to piece, but it can depend on the type of piecing you are doing., and I've heard folks call different stitching, blind stitching.. I think the first thing would be to make sure we're talking about the same stitch.. but bottom line, if you pull hard enough on hand pieced 'pieces' there will be gaps. whether they are blind stitched or running stitched. size of the gaps depends on the size of the stitches.
    So please tell me what you are calling "blind stitching."

  8. #8
    Power Poster RedGarnet222's Avatar
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    The normal stitch that is called a blind stitch is a hemming stitch. It is kind of a x when you look at it. It is called blind because it does not show from the outside when you are finished.

    Running stitch is the normal hand piecing method.

  9. #9
    Super Member EagarBeez's Avatar
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    Thank you all for your input. I wanted to do a quilt all by hand. I was looking for the best way to join my squares without too much showing. Someone had suggested using a blind stitch. I was sampling this stitch and found that it had too many gaps which I did not like, even though the stitches were concealed. It was also proving to take an awful long time to do.
    I tried the stitch that you all suggested and it works great. Sure I see a stitch here and there, but, nothing much at all.
    Thank you ever so much
    Brenda

  10. #10
    Power Poster MadQuilter's Avatar
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    The few times that I did work by hand, I used a double-back stitch. It's like a running stitch to start with but then I back-stitch half way and do another stitch half the distance ahead. Gosh I hope this makes sense. It may be overkill, but it is a very firm and secure seam.

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