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Thread: Question about HST's

  1. #1
    Senior Member pam1966's Avatar
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    I looked through the tutorial section but couldn't find an answer. If it's there, I'm sorry.

    My problem is a pattern I'm doing which calls for a ton of HST's. However, the pattern maker wants you to do it the hard way- sewing the triangles together instead of sewing squares and making them into HST's.

    I'm not good at math, so my question is, if the pattern calls for a 3 7/8" square to be cut into a triangle and THEN sewed into a HST, how much do I need to add so I can do it the easy way.

    Does this question make sense?

  2. #2
    a regular here cutebuns's Avatar
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    The same size, just draw a diagonal line down, sew 1/4 in on either side, cut and press. you will get a 3" square with the two HST making the square.

    For me I find doing them the way you explained easier, but that is just me.

  3. #3
    Senior Member pam1966's Avatar
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    Thanks for the answer! I like to do them that way because I'm more accurate at it than sewing the triangles together.

  4. #4
    a regular here cutebuns's Avatar
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    I find the best way to do things is how it actually works out for you the best. there is so many ways to do everything, I am mostly self taught, I have done some reading and such.

  5. #5
    Super Member janRN's Avatar
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    I find my HSTs are more accurate if I "round up". I would cut 4" squares, put them right sides together, draw the center line and sew 1/4 inch away on each side of the line. I cut them apart, press, and then trim to the correct size (whatever they were supposed to finish at in the first place). I just finished four blocks with 72 HSTs per block (I'm cross-eyed!!) and doing them larger and trimming they all fit together perfectly. Sure there's a small amount of wasted fabric, but that's worth it to me if my HSTs are accurate. Did this make sense? I know what I do but sometimes can't explain it well-sorry if I confused you more.

  6. #6
    Senior Member pam1966's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by janRN
    I find my HSTs are more accurate if I "round up". I would cut 4" squares, put them right sides together, draw the center line and sew 1/4 inch away on each side of the line. I cut them apart, press, and then trim to the correct size (whatever they were supposed to finish at in the first place). I just finished four blocks with 72 HSTs per block (I'm cross-eyed!!) and doing them larger and trimming they all fit together perfectly. Sure there's a small amount of wasted fabric, but that's worth it to me if my HSTs are accurate. Did this make sense? I know what I do but sometimes can't explain it well-sorry if I confused you more.
    That makes perfect sense! Thanks!

  7. #7
    Super Member justwannaquilt's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by janRN
    I find my HSTs are more accurate if I "round up". I would cut 4" squares, put them right sides together, draw the center line and sew 1/4 inch away on each side of the line. I cut them apart, press, and then trim to the correct size (whatever they were supposed to finish at in the first place). I just finished four blocks with 72 HSTs per block (I'm cross-eyed!!) and doing them larger and trimming they all fit together perfectly. Sure there's a small amount of wasted fabric, but that's worth it to me if my HSTs are accurate. Did this make sense? I know what I do but sometimes can't explain it well-sorry if I confused you more.
    This is exactly how I do mine, and I HATE trimming them but they always turn out so nice.
    I want to start on a quilt for my bed soon, it has 2704 1.5 inch HST in it! They all turn into 676 3 inch pinwheels. I get crossed eyed just thinking about it.

  8. #8
    Power Poster sandpat's Avatar
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    Oh my...I can't wait to see that quilt!!! :shock:

    I'm in the rounding up and trimming down school of HST..sew on 4" blocks..cut down to 3" HST's

  9. #9
    Super Member sewjoyce's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by janRN
    I find my HSTs are more accurate if I "round up". I would cut 4" squares, put them right sides together, draw the center line and sew 1/4 inch away on each side of the line. I cut them apart, press, and then trim to the correct size (whatever they were supposed to finish at in the first place). I just finished four blocks with 72 HSTs per block (I'm cross-eyed!!) and doing them larger and trimming they all fit together perfectly. Sure there's a small amount of wasted fabric, but that's worth it to me if my HSTs are accurate. Did this make sense? I know what I do but sometimes can't explain it well-sorry if I confused you more.
    This is what I always do also! Besides, it's easier to cut out 4" squares (for me) than it is 3 7/8" -- (where did that 7/8" mark go??? :shock: ) :D


  10. #10
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    There is another way to do multiple hst at one time- I don't remember what site I got this off of, hope this helps

    Two Large Rectangles = Multiple Triangles

    Using this method, you will cut large, but manageable rectangles, mark sewing and cutting lines, sew them, and then cut the triangles. The preparation/marking time is less than if you were marking each square separately. The sewing time also is less since there is only one unit of fabric to handle instead of individual triangles.
    Step 1 Determine how large to cut the rectangle pieces of fabric. To determine the cut size, take the finished size and add ⅞ to both sides. For example, if you are using 2 squares (finished size), the cut size will be 2⅞ square.
    Figure out how many of these squares you would like to have on your fabric. Using the above example, 6 squares across would require a 17 length, and 4 squares down would require a 11 width of fabric. This configuration would result in 24 squares of half-square triangles. You may wish to add extra on each of the sides.
    Step 2 On the wrong side of the lighter fabric, draw the cutting lines of your squares. Using the same example, mark 24 squares that measure 2⅞ each. Then draw a diagonal line through the center of each square. This, too, is a cutting line.
    Step 3 Place the fabric right sides together (one marked and the other one not marked). Sew each of the squares two times, on each side of the diagonal line through the center of the square.
    Step 4 Press the sewn rectangle to set the stitching. Cut on the drawn lines to make your triangles.
    First, cut the lines to make strips.
    Once you have strips, cut them apart into squares.

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