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Thread: Question

  1. #1
    jme
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    Can you tell me the advantages of binding the quilt? I usually just make my backing bigger and fold it over the top. Is there a difference other than looks or preference?

  2. #2
    Super Member Country1's Avatar
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    I do it both ways, don't know the correct answer. I decide depending upon what the quilt is for and what look I want.

  3. #3
    Super Member CloverPatch's Avatar
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    it is personal preference. I like a binding, It is part of my overall quilt pattern. Almost like another border to frame it. I have never brought the back over the front. I have folded my front over my back though.

  4. #4
    Power Poster sueisallaboutquilts's Avatar
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    When I was taught how to quilt they told me that an applied binding lasts longer than the fold over kind.
    I don't really know the answer though, as none of the quilts I've made are very worn yet.
    I do think that a separate binding looks more professional but it really depends on what you want to do.

  5. #5
    Super Member LindaM's Avatar
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    I've done bindings a few different ways. And there's a difference between making the binding from width-of-fabric strips or bias strips.

    The theory goes something like ... with width-of-fabric strips (or fold over from the back or front), the very edge of the binding now has only a few threads that are taking the stress of use.

    With bias strip bindings, there are many threads managing the stress of use, so it doesn't wear so quickly.

    Other ways I've done the binding - strips from the excess fabrics from the quilt front design - so you end up with a rainbow sort of effect.

    Another option! One fabulous week-long class I attended, the quilter "FACED" all his quilts - just like you would put a facing in clothing, sew the facing fabric to the edge, press and flip the entire thing over, and baste that down. He used between 2 and 3 inch facing strips. Makes a very crisp edge, also works well for scallops or quilts with lots of zingy edges - like fractured quilts.

  6. #6
    Super Member fabric_fancy's Avatar
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    an applied double binding is 2 thickness of fabric on both the front and back of the quilt.

    when you fold the backing over the front you don't have double thickness on both the front and the back.

    most people say that the binding area takes alot of wear and tear and if you don't use double thickness the binding will wear out.

    i don't know if this is true since 99% of my work is art quilts that hang on walls.

    i always do double binding on my quilts.

  7. #7
    jme
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    Thanks so much for your help. I have some different ideas now. :thumbup:

  8. #8
    jme
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    Quote Originally Posted by fabric_fancy
    an applied double binding is 2 thickness of fabric on both the front and back of the quilt.

    when you fold the backing over the front you don't have double thickness on both the front and the back.

    most people say that the binding area takes alot of wear and tear and if you don't use double thickness the binding will wear out.

    i don't know if this is true since 99% of my work is art quilts that hang on walls.



    I've thought this before, that it might get worn faster. Fact is binding scares me, think I'm just looking for the easy way out.

    i always do double binding on my quilts.
    :oops: :oops: :oops:

  9. #9
    jme
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    Quote Originally Posted by LindaM
    I've done bindings a few different ways. And there's a difference between making the binding from width-of-fabric strips or bias strips.

    The theory goes something like ... with width-of-fabric strips (or fold over from the back or front), the very edge of the binding now has only a few threads that are taking the stress of use.

    With bias strip bindings, there are many threads managing the stress of use, so it doesn't wear so quickly.

    Other ways I've done the binding - strips from the excess fabrics from the quilt front design - so you end up with a rainbow sort of effect.

    Another option! One fabulous week-long class I attended, the quilter "FACED" all his quilts - just like you would put a facing in clothing, sew the facing fabric to the edge, press and flip the entire thing over, and baste that down. He used between 2 and 3 inch facing strips. Makes a very crisp edge, also works well for scallops or quilts with lots of zingy edges - like fractured quilts.
    Faced, that sounds interesting! thanks for the new ideas!

  10. #10
    Power Poster Sadiemae's Avatar
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    I don't think it really matters unless the quilt will get a lot of use. I live alone and I am just not hard on a quilt, but I usually do a separate binding because I like using a different color than the back.

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