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Thread: questions about fusible facing in tee-shirt quilt

  1. #1
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    I am making my first tee-shirt quilt for my grandaughter's graduation. I am finding conflicting info, so I am going to ask this group what to do.

    I am using fusible interfacing called "Stacey" which I bought from the local quilt shop. I have washed and dried it as advised. Here are my questions:

    #1.....Do I make the facing the same size as my 14" blocks or do I make them 1" smaller as I also was told to do. If I make them 1" smaller (for 1/2" seam) how can I be sure they stay in place when done with the quilt? Should I be catching the edges in a seam line to secure them first? I will be using sashing.

    #2......I was told not to steam press the fusible interfacing, but to use a piece of muslim as a pressing cloth on the interfacing to make it adhere...Do I wet the muslim first and which side do I press...the interfacing side or the tee-shirt side to get the fusible to "stick"?

    I thank you in advance and will use the advice I get here to avoid any more confusion. I have read a lot and learned a lot about this type of quilt, but I have these points that are confusing me. Pauline

  2. #2
    MTS
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    #1- The smaller size suggested is to avoid having the extra bulk of the fusible in the seams.
    I've never found it to be a problem (I press the seams open), but I don't know how thick/stiff "Stacey" interfacing it. Never heard of it. But if it is an issue, as long as you do Step#2 correctly, cutting the smaller size will be fine.
    But I suggest pressing those seams open.

    #2 - The muslin (?) is to prevent the fusible from getting on your iron, and also in case the T-Shirt has motifs that can be distorted/melted if the iron touches it directly. I use an applique pressing sheet, but I if you don't have one, muslin can do the trick.

    Don't know the reason for wetting the muslin. I wouldn't. I would put the T-shirt square face down, then the interfacing fusible side down and then, using muslin/applique sheet, PRESS, not iron (according to whatever directions came with the interfacing).
    Let it cool to make sure you've got a good bond. If not, press some more.

    It's a very forgiving type of quilt.

    And your granddaughter is going to love it!

  3. #3
    Super Member suezquilts's Avatar
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    I use a Pellon type facing for my shirt quilts.
    ~Cutting the t shirts out roughly and my pellon out nearly to size. (I put a template I cut out of plexi glass over the shirt pattern so I have it centered correctly)
    ~fuse the pellon to the shirt (lightly)
    ~cut the block to size, I use a 1/4 " seam
    ~then I dampen the muslin, shirt side up, and set it in.

    I believe the fusible is for the sewing part, it may losen up in the process, can be re heated. When quilted the fusible helps with the stretching found in t shirts.

  4. #4
    Cyn
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    Great info- Thanks :)

  5. #5
    Super Member maryb119's Avatar
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    I cut the tee shirt much larger than the finished block size. Then, I place a teflon applique sheet down on my ironing board and then place the tee shirt face down on the teflon sheet and put the fusable interfacing glue side down on the wrong side of the tee shirt. I use steam to help make the glue stick to the tee shirt. I do this on each one. Then I cut the tee shirts in the size I want them to be in the quilt. I have learned to be generous with the pre cut size to allow the blocks to be cut to fit the design on them. Also, dont cut the blocks until after you put the stabilizer on the back. They stretch and distort the shape too easy and you just have to cut them twice to get them right.

  6. #6
    MTS
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    Quote Originally Posted by maryb119
    I use steam to help make the glue stick to the tee shirt. I do this on each one.
    Ah, so maybe that's why someone mentioned wetting the muslin - to create steam.

  7. #7
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    The answers to my tee-shirt quilt dilemna have certainly ended my confusion. I am glad I didn't dive into cutting and fusing until I was sure of what to do. Thank you all so much. I was so confused last night as what to do, I decided to wait and ask this group. Glad I did. Thanks again. I will post a px of the quilt when I am done. ;-)

  8. #8
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    The answers to my tee-shirt quilt dilemna have certainly ended my confusion. I am glad I didn't dive into cutting and fusing until I was sure of what to do. Thank you all so much. I was so confused last night as what to do, I decided to wait and ask this group. Glad I did. Thanks again. I will post a px of the quilt when I am done. ;-)

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