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Thread: Quilt binding

  1. #1
    Super Member karenpatrick's Avatar
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    I was just reading another post here about how much some of you hate binding a quilt. A local long armer suggested a few months ago that I start a home business doing the bindings which is something she doesn't do and gets a lot of requests for. Is that something you would pay for? I've done some research and other people charge 15 cents to 18 cents an inch. Is that something you would pay for?

  2. #2
    Super Member mhansen6's Avatar
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    I enjoy binding my own quilts. It is like the cherry on top of the chocolate sundae. But I know a lot of ladies who just hate it. That price sounds like a great deal.

  3. #3
    DJ
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    Super Member DJ's Avatar
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    I don't mind binding my quilts either, but since you've been advised that there's market in your area, and apparently someone who would refer business to you, I say go for it. Nothing ventured, nothing gained, and you certainly wouldn't have to make a large investment (except your time) to get it started. Would you be hand-stitching the binding to the backing?

  4. #4
    Senior Member quiltingaz's Avatar
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    I think it is a good idea. My LA'er offers binding and has someone who does it for her. I think a lot of them offer it. I personally love having the handwork to do in the evenings when I am watching TV.

  5. #5
    Super Member karenpatrick's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by karenpatrick
    I was just reading another post here about how much some of you hate binding a quilt. A local long armer suggested a few months ago that I starta home business doing the bindings which is something she doesn't do and gets a lot of requests for. Is that something you would pay for? I've done some research and other people charge 15 cents to 18 cents a foot. Is that something you would pay for?
    Just to add, I think that I would have to do it just locally, because I think the cost of shipping might make it too expensive.

  6. #6
    Super Member ckcowl's Avatar
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    i bind quilts for some of my customers, i don't mind doing it, the ladies who ask me to have arthritis and it pains them so to try hand stitching. I charge $20 to do a binding...$30 if it's a really big quilt (king)
    it is one of those things i can bring to work with me and work on and i just offer it as a curtesy- not as a money maker. most of my customers are on fixed incomes and i base all of my pricing to accomadate them...to allow them the opportunity to finish quilts (affordably)
    i haven't done the math to figure out what your (suggested prices) would come out to; you should probably base it on your location and what the customer base can afford.

  7. #7
    Super Member Lisa_wanna_b_quilter's Avatar
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    I would consider paying to have a special quilt bound. I've managed to make a mess of bindings enough times to see it as a good investment.

  8. #8
    Senior Member PWinston's Avatar
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    What is your definition of binding? Will you provide the binding or will the customer provide the binding? If the customer provides the binding will she cut it and sew the pieces together and press in half, then wind ready for it to be put on the quilt. Will the customer machine stitch the binding to the front of the quilt and you will only hand stitch it to the back? Or, will you machine stitch to front and hand stitch to back?

    Assuming all you will do is hand stitch to the back, for a 108" square quilt you would have 432" of binding, divided by 12" equals 36 feet times 18 cents a foot, you would make $6.48 to bind a king size quilt. I would certainly send my quilt to you for that price but don't think it would be worth your time to do it.

    I hate the hand stitching part of binding and would gladly pay someone to do it. However, it would have to be reasonable but believe that reasonable would be more than 18 cents a foot.

    Good luck in your decision.

  9. #9
    Senior Member
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    I think it sounds like a great way to earn a bit of extra money, especially if you can coordinate with the LAQ so that there is no extra shipping. Just make sure you take into account any expenses associated with getting/returning the quilts to the LAQ!

  10. #10
    Super Member PaperPrincess's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PWinston
    ...
    Assuming all you will do is hand stitch to the back, for a 108" square quilt you would have 432" of binding, divided by 12" equals 36 feet times 18 cents a foot, you would make $6.48 to bind a king size quilt. I would certainly send my quilt to you for that price but don't think it would be worth your time to do it.

    ...
    Good luck in your decision.
    The price under consideration is 18 cents an inch NOT a foot. So in the example above, it would be between 15 X 432 = $64.80 and 18 X 432 =$77.76 to bind the quilt. Don't know if this includes the fabric.

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