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Thread: Quilt Cleaning Cigarette Smoke Odor -- NEED ADVICE!!!

  1. #41
    Senior Member margecam52's Avatar
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    I would suggest you get it quilted first. No matter how secure it looks, the seams will fray and some will come apart. Once quilted you can try the washing methods given.
    Marge


    Quote Originally Posted by greatscott View Post
    My mother gave me a hand-made quilt 15 years ago. It has been stored in plastic and is in excellent condition except that it has a heavy nicotine/cigarette smell.

    I need to decide between airing it out, machine washing cold on delicate cycle, hand washing in cold water with mild detergent and then laying it out on towels or blankets, or taking it to a dry cleaner.

    I'm afraid to lay it out in the sun in case that might damage it. And I do not know if dry cleaners would care for it properly or be able to get the smell out.

    Thanks in advance for any advice or help you can offer.
    Marge Campbell
    TL18LS/Qbot automated quilter
    http://www.Lmcampbel.com

  2. #42
    Super Member piepatch's Avatar
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    I would highly recommend airing it out for several days, or possibly a couple of weeks in the shade before washing it. If you have a covered patio or a space where you could lay it out, or hang it, so the sun doesn't touch it, it should take the smell out, then I would wash it for sure.

  3. #43
    Super Member
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    I agree with soaking in a large tub of wash water with soda, vinegar and mild detergent. Dry in the dryer with a dryer sheet. Do NOT store in a plastic bag! Store in a closet on a hanger or in a large pillowcase. I have a glass and oak storage box that shows the quilts and keeps them safe.

  4. #44
    Senior Member
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    Oxyclean faded a quilt for me. I will not use it again on antique quilts or any quilts for that matter.
    Donna Quilts
    We help the wounded soldiers.

  5. #45
    Senior Member
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    You might also try some baking soda in your wash water. Hope one of the suggestions on here works for you. Good luck.
    Vonda-Texas MiMi of 4 Beautiful Grandbabies

  6. #46
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    DO NOT USE OXICLEAN - I've seen it destroy fabric with holes or turn it yellow.

  7. #47
    Super Member Mitch's mom's Avatar
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    My husband smokes. This is how I wash quilts. It may be a bit of work but I have not broken a seam yet. Knock wood.
    I line my bathtub with a clean, unfolded, white sheet. I fill the tub full enough of cool water to cover the sheet and the quilt I'm going to wash, then add 1/2 cup of sudsy ammonia to the water. I put the quilt in the tub getting it completely wet. I'll add more water if needed so I can 'swish' the quilt in the water. Once the quilt is wet I'll let it soak for about 10 minutes then I'll drain the tub. Once the water has drained I'll refill the tub with cool water to rinse. I usually do 2 complete rinses or until the water is clear. Once I'm done rinsing I press as much excess water out of the quilt as possible then I get one side of the sheet even with a side of the quilt and gently roll the quilt and sheet together 'jelly roll' style, all the while gently pressing water from the roll. Once I have as much water out of it as possible I hang it over 2 clothes lines. I carefully unroll one end and attach the sheet to the clothes line. I then unroll the rest of the quilt/sheet to attach the other side of the sheet to the other line, making a hammock to support the quilt, I spread the quilt out in the sheet as much as possible. As more water drains off, I spread the quilt out and fluff it periodically until it is dry.

    If you have someone to help hang it, it is an easy job, otherwise plan on getting wet.

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