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Thread: Quilt judging at the local fair

  1. #1
    Power Poster BellaBoo's Avatar
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    I do the quilt entries for our local fair and of course the judges are out of county. They (apology) are very elderly and very set in their quilt ways. No machine quilted quilt will win if there is a decent hand quilt entered. No matter how great the machine quilted quilt is in color, design or workmanship, the hand quilted one will win. It's to the point of the only quilts turned in to the exhibit are not the best. According to the fair supt. unless other people volunteer to judge out of their county quilts, the same judges are all we have. :evil: Please check with your local fair Supt and ask if they need volunteer judges in other counties. It's not hard, the judging criteria is simple and easy to follow.

  2. #2
    Moderator Up North's Avatar
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    I haven't entered in a fair in a very long time because you are right the judges are very set in their ways, I did it mostly when I taught 4H and didn't enter my own things. Thankfully the girls (ages 8-10) learned to tat and all got blue ribbons, that is a dying art and the judges were impressed. (as was I)

  3. #3
    Super Member justwannaquilt's Avatar
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    I find they also don't like "modern"(color or pattern) quilts.

  4. #4
    Super Member LucyInTheSky's Avatar
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    I entered a quilt show where the judges ripped apart (not literally, lol) my quilt. It definitely wasn't the best, but it was better then it got reviewed. Very discouraging...

  5. #5
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    the sad thing is the older generation wonders why this is a dying art and it appears to be that the older generation isn't open to new ideas and technologies.

    instead of embracing the new generation of quilt artists they choose to discourage any future efforts they might make.




  6. #6
    Super Member ghostrider's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kluedesigns
    the sad thing is the older generation wonders why this is a dying art and it appears to be that the older generation isn't open to new ideas and technologies.

    instead of embracing the new generation of quilt artists they choose to discourage any future efforts they might make.
    Please, I beg of you, do not make such sweeping statements about those of us in the "older generation". It is not the age of a person that gives them this attitude, for I have seen it demonstrated here among those who are decades younger and newer to quilting than I. The audence and judging on most levels beyond local, are much more accepting of current and forward thinking techniques and designs, regardless of their age.

  7. #7
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    i was making a statement in regards to the few situtations that have been posted above my post.

    it is not a reflection on you or your area or your age.

    "The audence and judging on most levels beyond local, are much more accepting of current and forward thinking techniques and designs, regardless of their age."

    this statement from you isn't even accurate because are local level is extremely open to new technologies and ideas.

  8. #8

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    Klue

    I am one of those older ladies. I beg to differ with you. Stereotyping the older generation as resisting change is a little insulting. Sure there are some who are set in their ways, as are the prejudices of the younger against them, but at my local fair, the judge was NOT old.
    Those who won a prize were some of this and some of that. Sheesh I know some of the older generation who love New York Beauty quilts and have made a few of them, using the newer batiks. I know some who are eager to try something new and bored with traditional quilts. Those who prefer traditional quilts, do so because that is their taste. So what? They are not an enemy and the wisdom and experience they bring to quilting is priceless if you take the time to listen. Don't forget also, the elderly , many of whom are women who quilt, are on a fixed income. It may be the very least, since women of their age did not go out and get a job, but stayed at home to raise the children because that was the custom of the day in which they lived. That means they may not have hundreds of dollars to spend on having every quilt they make quilted by a person who will do it for them. They may not have the bucks to spend on ten dollar a yard fabric to make a quilt, then add the hundred or more to have it quilted by machine. They prefer the camaradie and the social contacts of hand quilting with others. Old age can get very lonely, especially if one loses their spouse along the way and ones children are far far away.

    So, your comment is especially insulting, as far as I am concerned.

  9. #9
    Senior Member renee765's Avatar
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    Maryann,

    As an older lady who has lost her husband and also cannot afford the cost of someone else to machine quilt for me, I thank you.

    Renee

  10. #10
    Senior Member redrummy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Maryann
    Klue

    I am one of those older ladies. I beg to differ with you. Stereotyping the older generation as resisting change is a little insulting. Sure there are some who are set in their ways, as are the prejudices of the younger against them, but at my local fair, the judge was NOT old.
    Those who won a prize were some of this and some of that. Sheesh I know some of the older generation who love New York Beauty quilts and have made a few of them, using the newer batiks. I know some who are eager to try something new and bored with traditional quilts. Those who prefer traditional quilts, do so because that is their taste. So what? They are not an enemy and the wisdom and experience they bring to quilting is priceless if you take the time to listen. Don't forget also, the elderly , many of whom are women who quilt, are on a fixed income. It may be the very least, since women of their age did not go out and get a job, but stayed at home to raise the children because that was the custom of the day in which they lived. That means they may not have hundreds of dollars to spend on having every quilt they make quilted by a person who will do it for them. They may not have the bucks to spend on ten dollar a yard fabric to make a quilt, then add the hundred or more to have it quilted by machine. They prefer the camaradie and the social contacts of hand quilting with others. Old age can get very lonely, especially if one loses their spouse along the way and ones children are far far away.

    So, your comment is especially insulting, as far as I am concerned.
    I too, am of the older generation. I like hand quilting for looks and the idea of what it represents. and being of limited money, I agree we do not all have the ability to get the fancy done.
    We are not all stogy old people, I enjoy seeing quilts here, modern and traditional. We all have our likes, and I am sorry if someone made you feel unworthy by their criticisms, as they shouldn't have.

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