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Thread: Quilt Line calculations question

  1. #1
    Member Tracy_Lit5's Avatar
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    Quilt Line calculations question

    I posted this in someone elses post as a reply, but I think I did so in error.

    I have a project (wine tote) that is not a standard size. It's 13hx17-1/2w (cut size). I used various angles, but nothing works. I've tried 45 degree and 60 degree, but they don't work.
    It wouldn't be a problem except for the fact that the project is folded and seamed together so it's a tube at 13" high
    Every time I fold it, the points never match up. Is there some sort of formula? I could adjust the height to 13 1/2" high, but the 17 1/2w can't go smaller.
    There MUST be a formula or guide line somewhere...but I can't find it.
    Can anyone help me....please?
    The answer is no, unless you ask.

  2. #2
    MTS
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    OK. after reading, and re-reading, that 10 times, I think what you're saying is that you need the equivalent of a FINISHED 17" x 12.5" quilted piece, where, when folded forming a FINISHED tube 8.5" x 12.5", the patterns go seamlessly around the tube?

    Like one piece in a tessellation?

    I'm not even going to ask where the bottom of the tote comes in - I'm guessing it's a separate circle that will be attached to the tube.

    Are you making up the design on this piece, or is it a written pattern with blocks or very freeform?

    Right? Maybe? Close?

  3. #3
    Senior Member Tashana's Avatar
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    I am really not sure if i understood your question. What kind of quilting are you thinking of doing?

  4. #4
    Super Member sewingsuz's Avatar
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    I don't understand either.
    Suzanne
    Asking a seamstress to mend is like asking Picasso to paint your garage.

  5. #5
    Member Tracy_Lit5's Avatar
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    I cut the fabric 17 1/2" wide be 13" high
    I now need to quilt it in crosshatch style.
    But...any angle I use to quilt doesn't make the seams match when folded into the tote shape.
    This tote is the result of 45 degree crosshatch quilting....starting the quilting, when still flat, in the upper left corner
    As you can see....the seam screws up the cross points.

    I don't want to make the dimensions any smaller or the tote will be either to short or to tall, or to tight around or to loose. These dimensions make for the best fit around the wine bottles.

    The bottom circle is not the issue. I don't have problem with that...just the side seam.
    Actually, the dimensions, when complete are 12 3/4" high by 17" around

    Make better sense?

    Tracy
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    Last edited by Tracy_Lit5; 01-17-2013 at 03:44 PM.
    The answer is no, unless you ask.

  6. #6
    MTS
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    So don't do a 45 degree perfect crosshatch.

    You can do a straight horizontal/vertical, and that would match up.

    You can use the same color thread as the fabric, and that won't show up so blatantly.

    You can fold the piece, make registration marks (taking into consideration the seam allowance, whatever size it is),
    and then draw your grid for the cross hatching.

    Or just do free lines from side to side from (still using the walking foot if you don't want to FMQ) as long as one line begins on a registration mark on side A, and ends on side B (this would be my personal preference).

    Pic to follow

  7. #7
    MTS
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    Name:  winetote1.JPG
Views: 168
Size:  73.0 KB

    Ok, use your imagination because I did that in 1 minute (and my registration marks aren't perfectly spaced).

    The red dots on the sides are the registration marks (remember they should be ON the sewing line - inside the seam allowance, not edge of fabric)

    You can do the math, or divide it by folding and marking the middle, then the quarter, etc.

    If you have the same amount of marks on the side as the bottom, you'll end up with a diamond shaped crosshatch - and who cares what the exact degree measurement is.


    Of course, straight horizontal and vertical lines would works also. ;-)
    or just play around

    Name:  winetote2.JPG
Views: 165
Size:  81.8 KB

    Hope that helps.
    Last edited by MTS; 01-17-2013 at 04:15 PM.

  8. #8
    Member Tracy_Lit5's Avatar
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    I think I understand....it at least gave me the idea of trying to fold in half, then quarter, etc.
    I have a laptop case to make next, so I'll try it out on that.
    thanks for your help !

    Tracy
    The answer is no, unless you ask.

  9. #9
    Member Tracy_Lit5's Avatar
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    I got it figured out...and it works GREAT for wine totes, laptop cases....and much more
    Ok...say you have 13 " wide by 17" high and assuming you will be using " side seams
    I put my fabric on a cutting board in the bottom left corner at 1x1
    On left side, place a ruler " in from left edge of fabric.

    A)
    Place marker dots, (starting at the bottom) at 3", 5", 7", 9", 11", 13", 15" & 17" based on the numbers on the cutting board.
    This puts the dots " from edge at 2" increments.
    Repeat on the right side of the fabric.
    You can now move the fabric so you can make straight lines.

    B) (as noted with red lines)
    Using the ruler, draw a line from the 2" dot on the left to the 12" dot on the right.
    Draw the line on fabric from edge to edge
    Draw the next line from the 4" dot on the left to the 14" dot on the right.
    Draw line from edge to edge.
    Repeat for the 6" dot to the 16" dot.

    C)
    The top and bottom edge do not have dots,
    so in order to keep the lines straight,
    rotate the fabric to the left on the cutting
    board.. Position it so the first line drawn
    aligns with one line on the cutting board,
    such as the 12" vertical line.

    Use the markings on the ruler and the cutting board, position the long edge of the ruler at the 8" dot. To keep the line straight, ensure that the entire line on the ruler matches up with a vertical line on the cutting board. This is necessary because there is no second dot to line up with.
    Continue with all lines in that direction as noted with white lines.

    D) (as noted with the incomplete black lines)
    Rotate fabric back in the original position and draw lines in the opposite direction (as noted with the black lines):
    Draw the first line from the top left 12" dot to the bottom right 2" dot.
    Continue with drawing lines in the same manner
    as B) & C) above

    If you would like, you can find my .pdf file at:
    http://carneycreations.net/sewing/pu...uilt_Lines.pdf
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    The answer is no, unless you ask.

  10. #10
    MTS
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    Great solution!!

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