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Thread: quilt in a pillow

  1. #1

    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    3
    :roll:
    does anyone have a pattern to make a quilt which folds up into a pillow. Its an old pattern

  2. #2
    community benefactor Knot Sew's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    NY
    Posts
    5,723
    http://utut.essortment.com/howtomakequil_rihg.htm

    Here is one, its called a Quillow :D

  3. #3

    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Becky
    Posts
    708
    Do a google search for a Quillo. And there is alot of info on this site about them.

  4. #4

    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    3
    Thanks Ruth I will check it out on google

  5. #5

    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    3
    Thanks Rebecca I will check it out

  6. #6

    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    2


    Here is the directions for a Pillow Quilt.

    PILLOW QUILT


    DIRECTIONS


    Time: about 2-3 hours (pinning and sewing)

    Fabric and Batting

    At the fabric store of your choice, pick out coordinating fabric. You will need:

    • 2 yards for the top
    • 2 yards for the bottom
    • ½ yard for the pillow (if I am using a fabric that has panels, I will use one of them for the pillow)
    • 2-½ yards batting. Thin to medium batting works best, especially since you have to fold the material into the pocket. You can use the thicker batting, but it makes folding and stuffing difficult.
    • Coordinating thread (the multicolor threads break often while sewing, so I avoid them on this project).

    Wash and dry all fabric and batting. You don’t have to do this, but it is a precautionary measure to take so the finished quilt will not shrink when it is washed.

    Iron all fabric.

    Pillow

    • Place the batting on the table and straighten.
    • If you are using a panel, fold it with right sides together and place on batting.
    • Straighten material.
    • If you are using regular fabric, you can use Ό yard for the top and Ό yard for the bottom. Place the batting down first, then the first piece of material right side up on the batting; the second piece of fabric right side down.
    • Pin around all edges and some in the middle (to hold while sewing); leaving an opening at the top, side or bottom for turning inside out.
    • Looking at the pillow, I start sewing almost at the end of the top at the end of the opening (see arrow) and go along all the outer sides and end up at the other end of the opening, leaving the middle part open for turning inside out.

    Opening

    Leave room in the middle of the pillow open for turning inside out.

    • After sewing, turn inside out. Take a pin and pull out all 4 corners (so the pillow will look square).
    • Next, turn under the un-sewn edges at the top and pin.
    • Sew the middle. I usually find the middle, mark it and take a ruler and draw (with chalk) lines (horizontal and vertical). You can now sew your line. Turn the material and sew the other straight line (will look like a t).
    • Sew all the way around the edges. Set aside.

    Building the Quilt (similar to making the pillow)

    • Place the batting on the table and straighten.
    • Place 1 piece of fabric right side up on batting.
    • Straighten material.
    • Place 2nd piece of fabric on 1st piece of fabric (right sides together)
    • Place the pillow in between the 2 pieces of fabric; centering it (very important). Pin along the top.
    • Pin around all edges, leaving an opening on one of the sides for turning inside out.
    • Sew, leaving open the turning space.
    • Turn inside out.
    • Place heavy objects on 1 end and pull to straighten
    • Move heavy object to other end and pull to straighten.
    • Or have someone hold the other end and pull. Do the same for the other side.
    • I measure the fabric and mark my lines with chalk so I will know where to make my vertical sewing lines. Pin on these lines.
    • Horizontal lines: follow the lines from the pillow. Take a ruler, lay it on the fabric and mark lines with chalk.
    • Pin along these lines.
    • I first sew the horizontal lines; then the vertical lines.
    • Next is the Ό inch sewn line on the edge of the quilt.
    • Once that is done, cut threads. Take a damp cloth and wipe over the chalk line. If all of them do not come off, don’t get mad. They will wear off.

    Folding The Quilt

    • Put your hands inside the pillow opening. Grab fabric at both corners and pull (this will turn it inside out.
    • Straighten the fabric, starting from the inside of the pillow part all the way down.
    • Starting at the bottom, bring the bottom up and lay it at the bottom of the pillow top.
    • Go back to the bottom of this fold, and fold again and lay it at the bottom of the pillow top.
    • Take a hold of the bottom part, bring it up to the opening, and stuff it in. Make sure you straighten out the corners on the inside.
    • Voila! You are done.

    NOTES:

    If you use the heavier batting, it will not fold as nice (will have a bulky look to it, but that’s ok. I don’t use heavy materials either for this reason.

    Most everyone that I have given a pillow quilt to uses the pillow opening to put their feet in and pull the quilt up over them.

    I try to match the fabric to the individuals’ hobby or likes. Example: For a sportsman, I find material that has to do with what he does: baseball, football, hunting, etc.

    Have fun!


  7. #7

    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    2


    Here is the directions for a Pillow Quilt.

    PILLOW QUILT


    DIRECTIONS


    Time: about 2-3 hours (pinning and sewing)

    Fabric and Batting

    At the fabric store of your choice, pick out coordinating fabric. You will need:

    • 2 yards for the top
    • 2 yards for the bottom
    • ½ yard for the pillow (if I am using a fabric that has panels, I will use one of them for the pillow)
    • 2-½ yards batting. Thin to medium batting works best, especially since you have to fold the material into the pocket. You can use the thicker batting, but it makes folding and stuffing difficult.
    • Coordinating thread (the multicolor threads break often while sewing, so I avoid them on this project).

    Wash and dry all fabric and batting. You don’t have to do this, but it is a precautionary measure to take so the finished quilt will not shrink when it is washed.

    Iron all fabric.

    Pillow

    • Place the batting on the table and straighten.
    • If you are using a panel, fold it with right sides together and place on batting.
    • Straighten material.
    • If you are using regular fabric, you can use Ό yard for the top and Ό yard for the bottom. Place the batting down first, then the first piece of material right side up on the batting; the second piece of fabric right side down.
    • Pin around all edges and some in the middle (to hold while sewing); leaving an opening at the top, side or bottom for turning inside out.
    • Looking at the pillow, I start sewing almost at the end of the top at the end of the opening (see arrow) and go along all the outer sides and end up at the other end of the opening, leaving the middle part open for turning inside out.

    Opening

    Leave room in the middle of the pillow open for turning inside out.

    • After sewing, turn inside out. Take a pin and pull out all 4 corners (so the pillow will look square).
    • Next, turn under the un-sewn edges at the top and pin.
    • Sew the middle. I usually find the middle, mark it and take a ruler and draw (with chalk) lines (horizontal and vertical). You can now sew your line. Turn the material and sew the other straight line (will look like a t).
    • Sew all the way around the edges. Set aside.

    Building the Quilt (similar to making the pillow)

    • Place the batting on the table and straighten.
    • Place 1 piece of fabric right side up on batting.
    • Straighten material.
    • Place 2nd piece of fabric on 1st piece of fabric (right sides together)
    • Place the pillow in between the 2 pieces of fabric; centering it (very important). Pin along the top.
    • Pin around all edges, leaving an opening on one of the sides for turning inside out.
    • Sew, leaving open the turning space.
    • Turn inside out.
    • Place heavy objects on 1 end and pull to straighten
    • Move heavy object to other end and pull to straighten.
    • Or have someone hold the other end and pull. Do the same for the other side.
    • I measure the fabric and mark my lines with chalk so I will know where to make my vertical sewing lines. Pin on these lines.
    • Horizontal lines: follow the lines from the pillow. Take a ruler, lay it on the fabric and mark lines with chalk.
    • Pin along these lines.
    • I first sew the horizontal lines; then the vertical lines.
    • Next is the Ό inch sewn line on the edge of the quilt.
    • Once that is done, cut threads. Take a damp cloth and wipe over the chalk line. If all of them do not come off, don’t get mad. They will wear off.

    Folding The Quilt

    • Put your hands inside the pillow opening. Grab fabric at both corners and pull (this will turn it inside out.
    • Straighten the fabric, starting from the inside of the pillow part all the way down.
    • Starting at the bottom, bring the bottom up and lay it at the bottom of the pillow top.
    • Go back to the bottom of this fold, and fold again and lay it at the bottom of the pillow top.
    • Take a hold of the bottom part, bring it up to the opening, and stuff it in. Make sure you straighten out the corners on the inside.
    • Voila! You are done.

    NOTES:

    If you use the heavier batting, it will not fold as nice (will have a bulky look to it, but that’s ok. I don’t use heavy materials either for this reason.

    Most everyone that I have given a pillow quilt to uses the pillow opening to put their feet in and pull the quilt up over them.

    I try to match the fabric to the individuals’ hobby or likes. Example: For a sportsman, I find material that has to do with what he does: baseball, football, hunting, etc.

    Have fun!


  8. #8
    dcurvey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    114
    Here is a really detailed pattern I found on the web.

    http://www.binkypatrol.org/images/binky/patterns/quillow.pdf

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