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Thread: Quilt Show/Convention Classes

  1. #1
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    Quilt Show/Convention Classes

    I had a question given to me today that I would like your input. You were so very helpful in my question about basic quilt making classes. Here it is.

    What kind/type classes are you interested in taking when you attend a show or quilt convention with the intention of taking classes

    There are always the "stars" of the quilting world there but what other classes would you be interested in.
    One discussion reated to the level of the class. Does there need to be classes in more basic techniques.

    How much time do you like to spend in classes.

    What length of classes.

  2. #2
    Junior Member An Arm Long's Avatar
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    I would be interested in techniques such as doing circles, landscape quilts, etc. and I think 2 hours is a good time frame for me.
    Beth in Maryland

  3. #3
    Super Member Lori S's Avatar
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    I have yet to see a class on bobbin work from a really knowledgable teacher. I would think a 2 hour threshold , after that participants get a bit antsy!

  4. #4
    Power Poster dunster's Avatar
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    Right now I'm trying to improve my work on the longarm, so that is the type of class I will be looking for. Design, techniques, dealing with quilts that have problems...the list goes on. As far as piecing goes, there are so many techniques I would like to try. Most of them can be learned from a book, but a class gives you that special push to learn it sooner rather than putting it off for later. I like longer classes, at least 4 hours, preferably a full day or more. At the other end of the spectrum are the 45-minute quick-look classes given at the Sewing and Stitchery Expo in Puyallup. Those classes give you a brief and economical taste of a technique, enough to either whet your appetite or kill your interest. Unfortunately longer classes can be extremely expensive. In many cases I would prefer to buy a DVD from the instructor, so I can review the lesson if necessary, rather than sit in a classroom.

  5. #5
    Super Member Dolphyngyrl's Avatar
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    landscape,painting,embellishing,artsy style, FMQ type classes
    ,trapunto

  6. #6
    Super Member Dolphyngyrl's Avatar
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    mostly stuff not as common to find in a LQS

  7. #7
    Super Member hopetoquilt's Avatar
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    fabric folding, making tiny quilts that are postcards (can be mailed), how to decide on patterns/designs for FMQ, and making quilted bags (like bowtucks). Making a needle holder or pincushion (where you actually make the item in the class) would be cool.

    Timing on classes should be determined not by a preset slot but based on the content. Some are fast and others need much longer...

    "make and take" where you can leave with a sample of something you've made would be a way to draw me in. Alot of samples/show and tell, demonstrations, hands on portions would be great. Most people don't sit still for too long.

    I also get annoyed when people chat in the middle of a meeting or class.

    Classes should be clearly labeled and defined by skill levels and content. Having beginners in an advanced class asking questions that do not benefit anyone else is irritating. Being a more advanced quilter and accidentally attending a class that is too easy/basic is also irritating.

    Love it when the appropriate supplies are available to look at, try, and purchase so you can race home and try whatever you just learned. Not pushy sales, just available for purchase.

  8. #8
    Super Member Peckish's Avatar
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    I think a class on paper piecing would be great. There seem to be a lot of quilters asking questions about how to do it, and lots of other quilters who actively dislike it, and I often wonder if they dislike it because it can be confusing and difficult to learn from a book or website.

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