Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Results 1 to 6 of 6

Thread: Quilting with embroidery machine

  1. #1
    Super Member Dolphyngyrl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Southern California
    Posts
    4,868

    Quilting with embroidery machine

    I know you need 6 inches around for LA quilting, but for doing it with your embroidery machine how much wider should your backing and batting be from your top. I am going to try doing my patriotic quilt for my friend on my machine so I was just curious

  2. #2
    Super Member ckcowl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Northern Michigan
    Posts
    9,564
    the reason for the excess with the long arm is to have fabric to attach to the leads- top & bottom & hold with the clamps on the sides and to allow for the (take up) caused by the quilting/stitching process- it also helps if everything is not totally square so you don't run out of backing/batting as the quilt is rolled.
    using a domestic machine is a complete different process so the needs are different.
    make sure you baste well-
    if doing embroideries choose ones that are quite (open) a heavy embroidery will draw the fabric up ALOT...the excess need will be totally dependant on how close you plan to embroider--the process of decorative stitching 'draws up' the fabric- the bulk of the batting also causes the fabric to draw up some- if you've ever done embroidery/applique you will know what i mean- so excess fabric/batting is needed- and can be trimmed off later. quite often i notice on applique patterns they recommend cutting your backgrounds 1" larger - do your applique- then trim block to the correct size- it does depend on the amount of embroidery you plan to do-
    if you plan to do regular quilting (not embroideries) it depends on the density of the quilting- some batts need to be quilted every 2-4" which is quite dense and will 'draw up' more than a batting that is quilted every 10"...lots of variables. it is better to have too much & trim when completed- than to run out before reaching the end & having to figure out how to add batting/backing to the bottom in order to finish.
    hiding away in my stash where i'm warm, safe and happy
    Colleen's custom quilting; longarm services and custom quilt commissions.

  3. #3
    Super Member Dolphyngyrl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Southern California
    Posts
    4,868
    I am not doing appliques, I am going to embroider quilt top with standard quilting designs that you would FMQ with

  4. #4
    Super Member Candace's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Outer Space
    Posts
    9,733
    I make my quilt several inches larger all around. Not 6 inches, by any means, but several as the quilting will draw it up a bit. And having the extra all around makes hooping easier.

  5. #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    on the Iron Range in northern Minnesota
    Posts
    362
    Hi,

    I have stitched in the ditch on a quilt down some of the seam lines to hold it together. Then I embroidered quilting designs (like a long arm quilter would do) in some of the blocks. I used warm and natural batting and I had my batting and backing about 2-3 inches bigger around. I used my snap hoop so I didn't have to try and hoop all those layers in my regular hoop, worked well and I was pleased with results!
    Post a picture when you're done, would love to see it!
    Bev
    Our lives are like quilts....bits and pieces....joys and sorrows....stitched together with love.
    Babylock Crescendo, Elegante2, and Ellure.....for the love of sewing!

  6. #6
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    33
    I always heard to extend the backing to 4 inches around the whole quilt.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.