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Thread: Quilting Frames

  1. #11
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    I did a search on quilt frames and have been asking quilters which ones they have and how they like them.

    Now here is the catch. I do not intend to hand quilt. I have nerve damage in my fingers and cannot hold the needle. I want to be able to roll my quilts on a frame in order to get the layers together and smoothed out. Yes, I will probably have to baste them, then take them off the frame and do the quilting on my sewing machine.

    Does anyone have any comments about this idea for use of a quilt frame? Do you think it will work? If not, tell me why.

    The John Flynn frame really intrigues me. Does anyone have one of his frames?

    I can send a list of the frame I found on line if you would like to check them out before you purchase one. There is an Amish company that sells wooden frames. Gohn Bros. Mfg. Co. I found them listed on the internet as well.

    This is the best I have to offer for now. June

  2. #12

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    All I have for a quilt frame is 3- 1X2's I cut into. and they are about 3 feet long. they are the 2 I use for the side the 2 long one I attach my quilt to and quilt. when finish I take it apart and stand it in the corner of the extra room. And I clamp the boars together with c clamps.
    Juju :)

  3. #13
    Community Manager PatriceJ's Avatar
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    I think using the frame to baste sounds a lot better than having to crawl around on the floor.

  4. #14
    Moderator tlrnhi's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PatriceJ
    I think using the frame to baste sounds a lot better than having to crawl around on the floor.
    I never thought of that idea.
    Maybe will have to tell hubby I NEED one for Valentine's Day. :lol:
    I'm new here and still reading thru the posts. LOVE all the ideas you ladies have.

  5. #15
    Senior Member k_jupiter's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PatriceJ
    I'll bet male quilters on a budget would love this frame.
    Male quilters (at least this one) quilt with their bernina 830. I don't see that changing in the foreseable future (like the next 30 years). I don't see a quilting frame taking up room around here.

    *L*

    tim in san jose

  6. #16
    Community Manager PatriceJ's Avatar
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    Alex Anderson hosted a male quilter in a few episodes. Can't remember his name. He quilts by hand using a frame. Does gorgeous work.

    He quilts for 8 hours at a time - just as he'd put in a full day at any other job.

    Talk about ability to stay focused! Even if my hands didn't get too tired to keep going that long, my attention span would never hold out. LOL

    He's my Hand-Quiltin'-Hero!

  7. #17
    Senior Member k_jupiter's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PatriceJ
    Alex Anderson hosted a male quilter in a few episodes. Can't remember his name. He quilts by hand using a frame. Does gorgeous work.

    He quilts for 8 hours at a time - just as he'd put in a full day at any other job.

    Talk about ability to stay focused! Even if my hands didn't get too tired to keep going that long, my attention span would never hold out. LOL

    He's my Hand-Quiltin'-Hero!
    Obviously a transferance of the primary creative role from actual movement (quilting on the machine) to the planning state. I don't have the patience to hand quilt anything. As a robotics software engineer, I am use to instant gratfication. It works, or it doesn't. I like to see the results as I am working.

    And yes, I understand everyone is different, we all get out of our efforts what we put in.

    tim in san jose

  8. #18
    Community Manager PatriceJ's Avatar
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    So ... it only takes a few minutes to design and program a robot? And every robot you design works the first time?

    See? You have more patience and tolerance of delayed gratification than you give yourself credit for having.
    :mrgreen:

  9. #19
    Senior Member k_jupiter's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PatriceJ
    So ... it only takes a few minutes to design and program a robot? And every robot you design works the first time?

    See? You have more patience and tolerance of delayed gratification than you give yourself credit for having.
    :mrgreen:
    Ah... the robots I work with are already designed. I make them work. I look at the big picture of what needs to be accomplished, I design a plan to make that happen, then I wirte the code ( I am a minimalist programmer) and test. It works, or it doesn't. Kind of like building a quilt top. I plan it out, decide on the materials, do the drudge work of washing and ironing, do the cutting and sewing, and then it's done. As I mentioned in another thread, I have 288 half square trianges in the process, so I can do repetive tasks, I just let my mind wander as that 50% of my concentration is sapped by the sewing process. But we are talking days here, not weeks or months.

    We all have to know ourselves and figure out what we get out of this advocation we indulge ourselves in. Now back to programming robots. It's what they pay me to do.

    tim in san jose

  10. #20
    Member desertdebbe's Avatar
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    I have a John Flynn frame which uses the metal conduit instead of the wood rods. It has 3 poles and I am very happy with it. I did have to buy a table for it and it sits in my livingroom. I got it as I really didn't want to spend upwards of $500. for one. I don't have to baste, which is great. One day I hope to get one with bells and whistles, lucky you.

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