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Thread: Quilting larger quilts in sections?

  1. #1
    Super Member KimS's Avatar
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    I signed up for a newsletter and the first one I received made a suggestion on how to handle a larger quilt. (My next FMQing project happens to be a queen size.) I read through it and it makes sense but it also seems as though it could cause some problems too. Here's the link to the letter. http://www.quiltedparadise.com/n/mag...iclenewsletter What do you think about this and have you ever finished one like this? Any other suggestions on how to handle such a large quilt on a home sewing machine?

  2. #2
    Super Member PaperPrincess's Avatar
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    Yes, i've used it, this technique works very well.

    There are numerous other techniques to quilt as you go (QAUG) if you do a search, you should get lots of information, including tutorials.

  3. #3
    Super Member KimS's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PaperPrincess
    Yes, i've used it, this technique works very well.

    There are numerous other techniques to quilt as you go (QAUG) if you do a search, you should get lots of information, including tutorials.
    Thanks! I'll check them out. Right now I'm doing my first FMQing project which is a bit larger than a twin size and it's getting a little difficult to scrunch up the end into the throat of my machine.

  4. #4
    Super Member MaryAnna's Avatar
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    The newsletter's way sounds like a 'quilt as you go' system, only doing so in sections.
    It will work- but it depends on your quilt design, and it too sounds like it would be cumbersome on the machine. Not to mention a lot of handquilting.

    Here's another reference to another style of quilting as you go, it's easier and quicker, and appears to be adaptable to many block styles. It's called Fun and Done -check this one out- they have a instructional video clip : https://www.baysidequilting.com/store/scripts/prodList.asp?idCategory=284]https://www.baysidequilting.com/stor...idCategory=284[/url]

    My next quilt will be a queen sized one, and I plan on doing a version of the 'fun and done' style.

    I'm interested in seeing what everyone will post on this thread.
    Blessings,
    MaryAnna

  5. #5
    Super Member KimS's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MaryAnna
    The newsletter's way sounds like a 'quilt as you go' system, only doing so in sections.
    It will work- but it depends on your quilt design, and it too sounds like it would be cumbersome on the machine. Not to mention a lot of handquilting.

    Here's another reference to another style of quilting as you go, it's easier and quicker, and appears to be adaptable to many block styles. It's called Fun and Done -check this one out- they have a instructional video clip : https://www.baysidequilting.com/store/scripts/prodList.asp?idCategory=284]https://www.baysidequilting.com/stor...idCategory=284[/url]

    My next quilt will be a queen sized one, and I plan on doing a version of the 'fun and done' style.

    I'm interested in seeing what everyone will post on this thread.
    Blessings,
    MaryAnna
    I've already gotten a large amount pieced on the queen size I'm doing so I may try the method in the newsletter. Just don't want to have to rip out stitches.

  6. #6
    Super Member Prism99's Avatar
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    There is yet another method that I have seen described in one of Debra Wagner's books. Marti Michell has a book out now on this method.

    Basically you only split the batting into sections (3).

    First step is to layer top, batting and backing as usual. Baste only the middle third, using your method of choice.

    Then fold top and backing out of the way so you can cut off a third of the batting. You do this with a rotary cutter with large "S" curves in the cut. (This helps avoid a folding crease in the batting later on.) Use a Sharpie permanent marker to make registration marks along the cuts and label the batting piece top-left or top-right so that later on you can re-assemble the batting exactly as it was originally. Do the same with the other side.

    Quilt the middle section, leaving 4 to 6 inches of free space near the batting edge on each side. There will be much less bulk under the arm of the machine. After middle section is finished, re-assemble one side of the batting to the other using the registration marks. You can use a hand tailor-tacking stitch or a wide and long machine zigzag stitch to re-attach the two pieces. Smooth top and backing over, baste, and quilt that side. then do the other side.

    An advantage of this method is that nobody knows you quilted the quilt in sections. The batting joins are invisible.

  7. #7
    Super Member KimS's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Prism99
    There is yet another method that I have seen described in one of Debra Wagner's books. Marti Michell has a book out now on this method.

    Basically you only split the batting into sections (3).

    First step is to layer top, batting and backing as usual. Baste only the middle third, using your method of choice.

    Then fold top and backing out of the way so you can cut off a third of the batting. You do this with a rotary cutter with large "S" curves in the cut. (This helps avoid a folding crease in the batting later on.) Use a Sharpie permanent marker to make registration marks along the cuts and label the batting piece top-left or top-right so that later on you can re-assemble the batting exactly as it was originally. Do the same with the other side.

    Quilt the middle section, leaving 4 to 6 inches of free space near the batting edge on each side. There will be much less bulk under the arm of the machine. After middle section is finished, re-assemble one side of the batting to the other using the registration marks. You can use a hand tailor-tacking stitch or a wide and long machine zigzag stitch to re-attach the two pieces. Smooth top and backing over, baste, and quilt that side. then do the other side.

    An advantage of this method is that nobody knows you quilted the quilt in sections. The batting joins are invisible.
    Have you tried this method? I like the way this sounds since like you said the top is pieced as usual instead of in sections.

  8. #8
    Power Poster dunster's Avatar
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    I would recommend that you get Marti Michell's book, Machine Quilting in Sections. It explains several different methods of quilting in sections, and explains (with good examples) why and when you would use each method. I quilted several large quilts in sections before I got a longarm.

  9. #9
    Super Member GGinMcKinney's Avatar
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    I bought Marti's book today. It was at JoAnn's for 30% off. My queen quilt with sides to the floor (over sized queen) is ready to quilt. 1) I must practice FMQ-it has been a while 2) I needed a managable size.
    Marti has several methods. One similar to described above you divide into thirds, quilt the middle, splice the batting, turn the quilt around and quilt what was to the left of the center (it was not under the machine harp so it was out of the way-no need to trim the batting), then the 3rd side you reattached the batting, then quilt.
    This sounds perfect for my quilt. First is practice. I may use this technique on a table runner I am piecing just to see how it all fits together, then go for the quilt. Table runner is for me while the quilt is a gift and I want it to be special.

  10. #10
    Power Poster nativetexan's Avatar
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    this is the back of a king size siggy quilt i did that way. i happened to want to use up some fabric but only had it in three colors or i would have used all the same.

    back of king size qlt
    Name:  Attachment-245496.jpe
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Size:  81.4 KB

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